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dc.contributor.authorKronholm, Ilkka
dc.contributor.authorBassett, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBaulcombe, David
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Sinéad
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-18T10:16:04Z
dc.date.available2017-08-18T10:16:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-01
dc.identifier.issn0737-4038
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/266610
dc.description.abstractEpigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation or histone modifications, can be transmitted between cellular or organismal generations. However, there are no experiments measuring their role in adaptation, so here we use experimental evolution to investigate how epigenetic variation can contribute to adaptation. We manipulated DNA methylation and histone acetylation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii both genetically and chemically to change the amount of epigenetic variation generated or transmitted in adapting populations in three different environments (salt stress, phosphate starvation, and high CO2) for two hundred asexual generations. We find that reducing the amount of epigenetic variation available to populations can reduce adaptation in environments where it otherwise happens. From genomic and epigenomic sequences from a subset of the populations, we see changes in methylation patterns between the evolved populations over-represented in some functional categories of genes, which is consistent with some of these differences being adaptive. Based on whole genome sequencing of evolved clones, the majority of DNA methylation changes do not appear to be linked to cis-acting genetic mutations. Our results show that transgenerational epigenetic effects play a role in adaptive evolution, and suggest that the relationship between changes in methylation patterns and differences in evolutionary outcomes, at least for quantitative traits such as cell division rates, is complex.
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.subjectChlamydomonas
dc.subjectChlamydomonas reinhardtii
dc.subjectDirected Molecular Evolution
dc.subjectEnvironment
dc.subjectAdaptation, Biological
dc.subjectAdaptation, Physiological
dc.subjectDNA Methylation
dc.subjectEpigenesis, Genetic
dc.subjectMutation
dc.subjectGenetic Variation
dc.subjectEpigenomics
dc.subjectSalt Tolerance
dc.titleEpigenetic and Genetic Contributions to Adaptation in Chlamydomonas.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage2306
prism.issueIdentifier9
prism.publicationDate2017
prism.publicationNameMol Biol Evol
prism.startingPage2285
prism.volume34
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.12715
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-18
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/molbev/msx166
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-09
dc.contributor.orcidBaulcombe, David [0000-0003-0780-6878]
dc.identifier.eissn1537-1719
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idRoyal Society (511048K501/RH/JE)
pubs.funder-project-idRoyal Society (RP120015)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (340642)
pubs.funder-project-idInternational Balzan Prize Foundation (10957)
cam.issuedOnline2017-05-23
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-05-23


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