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dc.contributor.authorSpathis, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorHatcher, Hen
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Fen
dc.contributor.authorStone, Pen
dc.contributor.authorAbbas, Len
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorBrimicombe, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorThiemann, Piaen
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, MGen
dc.contributor.authorCampsey, Ren
dc.contributor.authorHooker, Len
dc.contributor.authorMoss, Wen
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-30T12:20:29Z
dc.date.available2017-08-30T12:20:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-17en
dc.identifier.issn2156-5333
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/266950
dc.description.abstractCancer-related fatigue is the most prevalent and distressing symptom experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs). An electronic survey was undertaken to ascertain current fatigue management and perceptions of its effectiveness. Eighty-five percent of responders (68/80) experienced fatigue, and it was worse more than 1 year after cancer treatment ended, compared to <1 year (p = 0.007). Forty-one percent received no fatigue management. Although advice to exercise was the most frequent intervention, the greatest impact of fatigue was on the ability to exercise and most did not find exercise advice helpful. Early intervention is warranted, supporting AYAs to persevere with increasing activity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Macmillan Cancer Support (grant No. 5592228).
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectfatigueen
dc.subjectlate effectsen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjectsymptom controlen
dc.titleCancer-Related Fatigue in Adolescents and Young Adults After Cancer Treatment: Persistent and Poorly Manageden
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.12225
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-22en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1089/jayao.2017.0037en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-07-17en
dc.contributor.orcidSpathis, Anna [0000-0002-9837-7281]
dc.contributor.orcidBarclay, Matthew [0000-0003-1148-1922]
dc.contributor.orcidBrimicombe, David [0000-0002-3443-3256]
dc.contributor.orcidBarclay, Stephen [0000-0002-4505-7743]
dc.identifier.eissn2156-535X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2017-07-17en
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:59:43 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International