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dc.contributor.authorBortolini, Een
dc.contributor.authorPagani, Len
dc.contributor.authorCrema, Enricoen
dc.contributor.authorSarno, Sen
dc.contributor.authorBarbieri, Cen
dc.contributor.authorBoattini, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSazzini, Men
dc.contributor.authorda Silva, SGen
dc.contributor.authorMartini, Gen
dc.contributor.authorMetspalu, Men
dc.contributor.authorPettener, Den
dc.contributor.authorLuiselli, Den
dc.contributor.authorTehrani, JJen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-04T10:49:06Z
dc.date.available2017-09-04T10:49:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-07en
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/267008
dc.description.abstractObservable patterns of cultural variation are consistently intertwined with demic movements, cultural diffusion, and adaptation to different ecological contexts [Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman (1981) Cultural Transmission and Evolution: A Quantitative Approach; Boyd and Richerson (1985) Culture and the Evolutionary Process]. The quantitative study of gene–culture coevolution has focused in particular on the mechanisms responsible for change in frequency and attributes of cultural traits, the spread of cultural information through demic and cultural diffusion, and detecting relationships between genetic and cultural lineages. Here, we make use of worldwide whole-genome sequences [Pagani et al. (2016) Nature 538:238–242] to assess the impact of processes involving population movement and replacement on cultural diversity, focusing on the variability observed in folktale traditions (n = 596) [Uther (2004) The Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography. Based on the System of Antti Aarne and Stith Thompson] in Eurasia. We find that a model of cultural diffusion predicted by isolation-by-distance alone is not sufficient to explain the observed patterns, especially at small spatial scales (up to ∼∼4,000 km). We also provide an empirical approach to infer presence and impact of ethnolinguistic barriers preventing the unbiased transmission of both genetic and cultural information. After correcting for the effect of ethnolinguistic boundaries, we show that, of the alternative models that we propose, the one entailing cultural diffusion biased by linguistic differences is the most plausible. Additionally, we identify 15 tales that are more likely to be predominantly transmitted through population movement and replacement and locate putative focal areas for a set of tales that are spread worldwide.
dc.description.sponsorshipE.B. is supported by SimulPast Consolider Ingenio Project CSD2010-00034 funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry, and Competitiveness. L.P. is supported by the European Union through European Regional Development Fund Projects 2014-2020.4.01.16-0030 and 2014-2020.4.01.15-0012.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences
dc.subjectcultural diffusionen
dc.subjectdemic diffusionen
dc.subjectwhole-genome sequencesen
dc.subjectfolktalesen
dc.subjectEurasiaen
dc.titleInferring patterns of folktale diffusion using genomic dataen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage9145
prism.issueIdentifier34en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen
prism.startingPage9140
prism.volume114en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.12424
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-06-13en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1073/pnas.1614395114en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-07en
dc.contributor.orcidCrema, Enrico [0000-0001-6727-5138]
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2017-08-07en
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-02-07


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