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dc.contributor.authorMonier, Elizabethen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T08:52:39Z
dc.date.available2017-11-06T08:52:39Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/268092
dc.description.abstractSince the Arab uprisings began in 2010, some communities have experienced increased levels of violence or insecurity on the basis of their ethnic, religious, or linguistic identity. This article examines how such communities have mobilized and developed their media strategies in order to protect themselves and adapt to their changing circumstances. Through investigating the cases of Coptic Christians in Egypt and Ezidis in Iraq, this article demonstrates that both of these communities have begun to connect their community interests with international political concerns and narratives through engaging with global media. Recent scholarship on indigenous media shows globalizing trends in media production and consumption have led indigenous media to increasingly tap into both national and global media to support their advocacy. In my case studies, the move to engage global media has particularly flourished since 2014 but the emphasis is on direct engagement with international political discourses through global media. Most notable is the mobilization of a campaign to recognize violence against Christians and Ezidis in the Middle East as genocide. The aims in engaging the international level differ between the Coptic and Ezidi cases. For Copts, there is a balance between raising the profile of violence against Copts in global media while employing narratives that support Egyptian state policies and strengthen pre-existing Coptic discourses of national belonging. Ezidi diaspora activists seek international protection and potentially an autonomous area in Iraq. This article argues that the differences in the terms and aims of global media engagement stem partly from the way the community perceives its status within the home nation, particularly with regards the notion of being a minority, as well as experiences of national belonging.
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherAmerican University in Cairo
dc.titleMiddle Eastern Minorities in Global Media and the Politics of National Belongingen
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier24en
prism.publicationNameArab Media & Societyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.14315
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-07-02en
rioxxterms.versionVoR*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-07-02en
dc.contributor.orcidMonier, Elizabeth [0000-0002-8608-2400]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2017-07-24en
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.arabmediasociety.com/?article=1028en


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