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dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorImamura, Fumiakien
dc.contributor.authorBrage, Sorenen
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorWareham, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorForouhi, Nitaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-24T11:35:59Z
dc.date.available2017-11-24T11:35:59Z
dc.date.issued2018-08en
dc.identifier.issn0261-5614
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/269655
dc.description.abstractBackground & aims Associations of dietary sugars with metabolic and inflammatory markers may vary according to the source of the sugars. The aim of this study was to examine the association of dietary sugars from different sources [beverages (liquids), foods (solids), extrinsic (free) or intrinsic (non-free)] with metabolic and inflammatory markers. Methods Population-based cross-sectional study of adults in the East of England (n = 9678). Sugar intakes were estimated using food frequency questionnaires. Fasting glycated haemoglobin, glucose, insulin, and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) were measured and indices of metabolic risk were derived (homeostatic model of insulin resistance, HOMA-IR and metabolic risk z-score). Results In multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for potential confounders including BMI and TEI, sugars from liquids were positively associated with ln-CRP [b-coefficient (95%CI), 0.14 (0.05,0.22) per 10%TEI] and metabolic risk z-score [0.13 (0.07,0.18)]. Free sugars were positively associated with ln-HOMA-IR [0.05 (0.03,0.08)] and metabolic risk z-score [0.09 (0.06,0.12)]. Sugars from solids were not associated with any outcome. Among major dietary contributors to intakes (g/d), sugars in fruit, vegetables, dairy products/egg dishes, cakes/biscuits/confectionary and squash/juice drinks were not associated, but sugar added to tea, coffee, cereal was significantly positively associated with all outcomes. Sugars in 100% juice [0.16 (0.06,0.25) per 10%TEI] and other non-alcoholic beverages [0.13 (0.03,0.23)] were positively associated with metabolic risk z-score. Conclusion Higher intakes of sugars from non-alcoholic beverages and sugar added to tea, coffee, cereal were associated with glycaemia and inflammatory markers. Sugars from solids were not associated, irrespective of whether they were intrinsic or extrinsic. Positive associations of free sugars were largely explained by contribution of beverages to intake.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Fenland Study was funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council. Support from Medical Research Council programmesMC_UU_12015/1 and MC_UU_12015/5 is acknowledged.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectInflammationen
dc.subjectBlood Glucoseen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectEnergy Intakeen
dc.subjectEatingen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subjectDietary Sugarsen
dc.titleIntakes and sources of dietary sugars and their association with metabolic and inflammatory markers.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1322
prism.issueIdentifier4en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameClinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)en
prism.startingPage1313
prism.volume37en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.10346
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-30en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.clnu.2017.05.030en
rioxxterms.versionAM*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08en
dc.contributor.orcidO'Connor, Laura [0000-0002-6022-2022]
dc.contributor.orcidImamura, Fumiaki [0000-0002-6841-8396]
dc.contributor.orcidBrage, Soren [0000-0002-1265-7355]
dc.contributor.orcidGriffin, Simon [0000-0002-2157-4797]
dc.contributor.orcidWareham, Nicholas [0000-0003-1422-2993]
dc.contributor.orcidForouhi, Nita [0000-0002-5041-248X]
dc.identifier.eissn1532-1983
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/4)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/3)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (NF-SI-0512-10135)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146281)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_PC_13046)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/5)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-06-17


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International