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dc.contributor.authorBell, Andyen
dc.contributor.authorBultitude, Janet Hen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-10T17:05:53Z
dc.date.available2018-04-10T17:05:53Z
dc.date.issued2018-07en
dc.identifier.issn0028-3932
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/274750
dc.description.abstractThe study of patients with brain lesions has contributed greatly to our understanding of the biological bases of human cognition, but this approach also has several unavoidable limitations. Research that uses animal models complements and extends human neuropsychology by addressing many of these limitations. In this review, we provide an overview of permanent and reversible animal lesion techniques for researchers of human neuropsychology, with the aim of highlighting how these methods provide a valuable adjunct to behavioural, neuroimaging, physiological, and clinical investigations in humans. Research in animals has provided important lessons about how the limitations of one or more techniques, or differences in their mechanism of action, has impacted upon the understanding of brain organisation and function. These cautionary tales highlight the importance of striving for a thorough understanding of how any intereference technique works (whether in animal or human), and for how to best use animal research to clarify the precise mechanisms underlying temporary lesion methods in humans.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectBrain Injuriesen
dc.subjectDisease Models, Animalen
dc.subjectCognition Disordersen
dc.subjectNeuropsychologyen
dc.titleMethods matter: A primer on permanent and reversible interference techniques in animals for investigators of human neuropsychology.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage219
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameNeuropsychologiaen
prism.startingPage211
prism.volume115en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.21888
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-09-19en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.09.019en
rioxxterms.versionVoR*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07en
dc.contributor.orcidBell, Andy [0000-0001-8420-4622]
dc.contributor.orcidBultitude, Janet H [0000-0003-4648-6184]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3514
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (unknown)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:58:19 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International