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dc.contributor.authorBuck, Jackieen
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Lizen
dc.contributor.authorMoth, Lorraineen
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-01T10:22:32Z
dc.date.available2018-05-01T10:22:32Z
dc.date.issued2020-09en
dc.identifier.issn2045-435X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/275365
dc.description.abstractAbstract Objective: To describe the nature and scope of a new Hospice at Home service and to identify its equality of provision. Methods: Case note review of patients supported by a Hospice at Home service for one year from September 2012 to August 2013 (n=321). Descriptive analysis to report frequencies and proportions of quantitative data extracted from service logs, referral forms and care records; thematic analysis of qualitative data from care record free text. Results: Demand outstripped supply. Twice as many night care episodes were requested (n=1237) as were provided (n=613). Inequalities in access to the service related to underlying diagnosis and socioeconomic status. 75% of patients using the service had cancer (221/293 with documented diagnosis). Of those who died at home in the areas surrounding the hospice, 53% (163/311) of people with cancer and 11% (49/431) of those without cancer received Hospice at Home support. People who received Hospice at Home care were often more affluent than the population average for the area within which they lived. Roles of the service identified included: care planning/implementation, specialist end of life care assessment and advice, ‘holding’ complex patients until hospice beds become available, and clinical nursing care. Conclusion: There is significant unmet need and potentially large latent demand for the Hospice at Home service. People without cancer or of lower socio-economic status are less likely to access the service. Action is needed to ensure greater and more equitable service provision in this and similar services nationally and internationally.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherBMJ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectNeoplasmsen
dc.subjectHospice Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Surveysen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectHome Care Servicesen
dc.subjectReferral and Consultationen
dc.subjectHealth Services Accessibilityen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectHealthcare Disparitiesen
dc.subjectHospice and Palliative Care Nursingen
dc.titlePersistent inequalities in Hospice at Home provision.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier3en
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameBMJ supportive & palliative careen
prism.startingPagee23
prism.volume10en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.22557
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-01-03en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmjspcare-2017-001367en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-09en
dc.contributor.orcidBuck, Jackie [0000-0002-3598-2329]
dc.contributor.orcidBarclay, Stephen [0000-0002-4505-7743]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-4368
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (via Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) (unknown)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:59:30 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International