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dc.contributor.authorBonnet-Lebrun, Anne-Sophie
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-04T14:08:28Z
dc.date.available2018-05-04T14:08:28Z
dc.date.submitted2018-03-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/275584
dc.description.abstractSpecies’ ranges arise from the interplay between environmental preferences, biotic and abiotic environmental conditions, and accessibility. Understanding of – and predictive models on – species distributions often build from the assumption that these factors apply homogenously within each species, but there is growing evidence for individual variation. Here, I use movement data to investigate individual-level decisions and compromises regarding the different costs and benefits influencing individuals’ geographic locations, and the species-level spatial patterns that emerge from these. I first developed a new method that uses tracking data to quantify individual specialisation in geographic space (site fidelity) or in environmental space (environmental specialisation). Applying it to two species of albatrosses, I found evidence of site fidelity but weak environmental specialisation. My results have implications for how limited research efforts are best-targeted: if animals are generalists, effort are best spent by understanding in depth individual patterns, i.e., better to track fewer individuals for long periods of time; whereas if animals tend to be specialists, efforts should be dedicated to tracking as many individuals as possible, even if for shorter periods. I then investigated individual migratory strategies and their drivers in nine North American bird species, using ringing/recovery data. I found latitudinal redistribution of individuals within the breeding and non-breeding ranges that generally did not follow textbook patterns (‘chain migration’ or ‘leapfrog migration’). Migratory individuals tend to trade off the benefits of migration (better tracking of climatic niche; better access to resources) and its costs (increasing with migratory distance). I found that birds are more likely to remain as residents in areas with warmer winter temperatures, higher summer resource surpluses and higher human population densities (presumably because of a buffering effect of urban areas). Overall, my results highlight the importance of considering individual variation to understanding the ecological processes underpinning species’ spatial patterns.
dc.description.sponsorshipSt John's College Benefactors' Scholarship Cambridge Philosophical Society
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectmigration
dc.subjectbirds
dc.subjectindividual variability
dc.subjectforaging strategies
dc.subjectspace use
dc.subjectindividual specialisation
dc.subjectsite fidelity
dc.subjectresidency
dc.subjectmigration patterns
dc.subjecttracking data
dc.subjectringing data
dc.subjectmovement
dc.subjectecology
dc.titleIntraspecific variation in environmental and geographic space use: insights from individual movement data
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.publisher.departmentZoology
dc.date.updated2018-05-04T09:40:33Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.22826
dc.contributor.orcidBonnet-Lebrun, Anne-Sophie [0000-0002-7587-615X]
dc.publisher.collegeSt John's College
dc.type.qualificationtitlePhD in Zoology
cam.supervisorManica, Andrea
cam.supervisorRodrigues, Ana Sofia Luis
cam.supervisor.orcidManica, Andrea [0000-0003-1895-450X]
cam.thesis.fundingfalse
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-05-04


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