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dc.contributor.authorKeevil, Victoriaen
dc.contributor.authorLuben, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorHayat, Shabinaen
dc.contributor.authorSayer, Avan Aen
dc.contributor.authorWareham, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, Kay-Teeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-25T13:54:15Z
dc.date.available2018-05-25T13:54:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-01en
dc.identifier.issn0167-4943
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/276217
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Low physical capability predicts mortality, perhaps by association with co-morbidity. However, few studies include participants <70 years old with lower co-morbidity burdens compared to older adults. We examined relationships between usual walking speed (UWS), timed chair stands speed, grip strength, standing balance and all-cause mortality in 8477 participants aged 48-92 years enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer-Norfolk study. Methods Participants (55.1% female) were followed up for 6.0 years (inter-quartile range 4.6, 7.5). Associations were examined using Cox proportional hazards regression by age-group (<70 years versus >70 years) and then in the whole cohort adjusted for age, sex, anthropometry, history of diabetes/ stroke/ myocardial infarction/ cancer, smoking, alcohol intake, socioeconomic status, television viewing time and physical activity. Results Age and sex adjusted associations were similar in younger and older participants (Pinteraction all >0.05) and those with lower physical capability had higher mortality risk. For example, in those <70 years old hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for mortality in the third, second and lowest sex-specific quartiles of UWS compared to the highest were 1.21 (0.75, 1.96), 2.11 (1.35, 3.28) and 2.91 (1.84, 4.62) and in participants >70 years old were 1.19 (0.73, 1.95), 2.09 (1.35, 3.24) and 2.64 (1.73, 4.02) respectively. In the whole cohort, strong associations between all physical capability tests and mortality persisted after multivariable adjustment and after excluding participants with co-morbidity. Conclusions Physical capability was independently predictive of future mortality risk with similar associations in late mid-life, when co-morbidity burden is lower, as at older age.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectHand Strengthen
dc.subjectMortalityen
dc.subjectProportional Hazards Modelsen
dc.subjectComorbidityen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPostural Balanceen
dc.subjectWalking Speeden
dc.titlePhysical capability predicts mortality in late mid-life as well as in old age: Findings from a large British cohort study.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage82
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameArchives of gerontology and geriatricsen
prism.startingPage77
prism.volume74en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.13825
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-02en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.archger.2017.10.001en
rioxxterms.versionVoR*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01en
dc.contributor.orcidKeevil, Victoria Louise [0000-0001-6148-0640]
dc.contributor.orcidLuben, Robert [0000-0002-5088-6343]
dc.contributor.orcidWareham, Nicholas [0000-0003-1422-2993]
dc.contributor.orcidKhaw, Kay-Tee [0000-0002-8802-2903]
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6976
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000143)
pubs.funder-project-idResearch into Ageing (RiA) (262)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0401527)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (092077/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idMEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (MR/N003284/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/1)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (NF-SI-0512-10135)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/3)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/4)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (NF-SI-0617-10149)
pubs.funder-project-idCancer Research UK (A8257)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International