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dc.contributor.authorBylund-Grenklo, Tove
dc.contributor.authorKreicbergs, Ulrika
dc.contributor.authorUggla, Charlotta
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
dc.contributor.authorNyberg, Tommy
dc.contributor.authorSteineck, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorFürst, Carl Johan
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-21T13:03:31Z
dc.date.available2018-06-21T13:03:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.issn0284-186X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/277332
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate cancer-bereaved youths' opinions and experiences of being told about a parent's imminent death from cancer and of barriers to this communication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This nationwide population-based survey included 622/851 (73%) youths (aged 18-26) who at age 13-16, 6-9 years earlier had lost a parent to cancer. RESULTS: In total 595 of 610 (98%) of the participants stated that teenage children should be informed when the parent's death was imminent (i.e. a matter of hours or days, not weeks). 59% stated that they themselves had been told this, 37% by the parents, 7% by parents and healthcare professionals together and 8% by professionals only. Frequent reasons for why the teenager and parents did not talk about imminent death before loss were that one (n=106) or both (n=25) of the parents together with the teenage child had pretended that the illness was not that serious, or that none of the parents had been aware that death was imminent (n=80). Up to a couple of hours before the loss, 43% of participants had not realized that death was imminent. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study virtually all youth who at ages 13-16 had lost a parent to cancer afterwards stated that teenagers should be told when loss is near, i.e. a matter of hours or days, not weeks. Many stated that they had not been given this information and few were informed by professionals, with implications for future improvements in end-of-life care of patients with teenage children.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectTerminal Care
dc.subjectAttitude to Death
dc.subjectCommunication Barriers
dc.subjectTruth Disclosure
dc.subjectParent-Child Relations
dc.subjectParents
dc.subjectProfessional-Family Relations
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild of Impaired Parents
dc.subjectSweden
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectPsychology, Adolescent
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnaires
dc.titleTeenagers want to be told when a parent's death is near: A nationwide study of cancer-bereaved youths' opinions and experiences.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage950
prism.issueIdentifier6
prism.publicationDate2015
prism.publicationNameActa Oncol
prism.startingPage944
prism.volume54
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.24624
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3109/0284186X.2014.978891
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-06
dc.contributor.orcidNyberg, Tommy [0000-0002-9436-0626]
dc.identifier.eissn1651-226X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2014-12-03


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