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dc.contributor.authorAzad, Arsalan Afzal
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03T09:12:08Z
dc.date.available2018-07-03T09:12:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-10
dc.date.submitted2017-09-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/277748
dc.description.abstractThe important role of the central intermediary metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA)for several anabolic and catabolic pathways is well characterised. However, the role of AcCoA as the only known donor of acetyl groups for protein acetylation in regulation of enzyme activities, protein complex stability as well as epigenetic status off chromatin, is only recently emerging. Among multiple other pathways, the autophagy pathway has now been shown to be directly regulated by protein acetylation and deacetylation. Therefore, it was reasoned that the availability of AcCoA, via the modulation of AcCoA generating enzymes, may regulate autophagy. This study has focussed on the role of the acetate-mediated route to nuclear-cytosolic AcCoA synthesis, catalysed by AcCoA synthetase 2 (ACSS2), in the regulation of autophagy.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectACSS2
dc.subjectAUTOPHAGY
dc.subjectACETYL-COA
dc.subjectACETYLATION
dc.subjectPOST TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS
dc.subjectEPIGENETICS
dc.subjectACLY
dc.subjectLIPID SYNTHESIS
dc.titleCHARACTERISING A ROLE FOR ACETYLCOENZYME A SYNTHETASE 2 IN THE REGULATION OF AUTOPHAGY
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.publisher.departmentBabraham Institute
dc.date.updated2018-07-03T06:40:41Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.25086
dc.publisher.collegeJesus College
dc.type.qualificationtitlePhD Molecular Biology
cam.supervisorWakelam , Michael
cam.thesis.fundingtrue
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2400-01-01


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