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dc.contributor.authorDrumright, Lydiaen
dc.contributor.authorWeir, Sharon Sen
dc.contributor.authorFrost, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-05T08:59:46Z
dc.date.available2018-07-05T08:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-07en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/277819
dc.description.abstractBackground Venues form part of the sampling frame for time-location sampling, an approach often used for HIV surveillance. While sampling location is often regarded as a nuisance factor, venues may play a central role in structuring risk networks. We investigated individual reports of risk behaviors and infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) attending different venues to examine structuring of HIV risk behaviors. However, teasing apart ‘risky people’ from ‘risky places’ is difficult, as individuals cannot be randomized to attend different venues. However, we can emulate this statistically using marginal structural models, which inversely weight individuals according to their estimated probability of attending the venue. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 609 MSM patrons of 14 bars in San Diego, California, recruited using the Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) methodology, which consists of a multi-level identification and assessment of venues for HIV risk through population surveys. Results and Discussion Venues differed by many factors, including participants’ reported age, ethnicity, number of lifetime male partners, past sexually transmitted infection (STI), and HIV status. In multivariable marginal structural models, venues demonstrated structuring of HIV+ status, past STI, and methamphetamine use, independently of individual-level characteristics. Conclusions Studies using time-location sampling should consider venue as an important covariate, and the use of marginal structural models may help to identify risky venues. This may assist in widespread, economically feasible and sustainable targeted surveillance and prevention. A more mechanistic understanding of how 'risky venues' emerge and structure risk is needed.
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectSexually Transmitted Diseasesen
dc.subjectHIV Infectionsen
dc.subjectAmphetamine-Related Disordersen
dc.subjectMethamphetamineen
dc.subjectPopulation Surveillanceen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectRisk-Takingen
dc.subjectHomosexuality, Maleen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectRestaurantsen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectCaliforniaen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.titleThe role of venues in structuring HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and risk networks among men who have sex with men.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameBMC public healthen
prism.startingPage225
prism.volume18en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.25159
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-02-01en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s12889-018-5140-3en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-02-07en
dc.contributor.orcidDrumright, Lydia [0000-0002-3361-8080]
dc.contributor.orcidFrost, Simon [0000-0002-5207-9879]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2458
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146218)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) (R21NR010961)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International