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dc.contributor.authorTibon, Ronien
dc.contributor.authorGreve, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorHenson, Riken
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T16:14:56Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T16:14:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-10en
dc.identifier.issn0090-502X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/278859
dc.description.abstractUnitization refers to the creation of a new unit from previously distinct items. The concept of unitization has been used to explain how novel pairings between items can be remembered without requiring recollection, by virtue of new, item-like representations that enable familiarity-based retrieval. We tested an alternative account of unitization – a schema account – which suggests that associations between items can be rapidly assimilated into a schema. We used a common operationalization of “unitization” as the difference between two unrelated words being linked by a definition, relative to two words being linked by a sentence, during an initial study phase. During the following relearning phase, a studied word was re-paired with a new word, either related or unrelated to the original associate from study. In a final test phase, memory for the Relearned associations was tested. We hypothesized that, if unitized representations act like schemas, then we would observe some generalization to related words, such that memory would be better in the definition than sentence condition for related words, but not for unrelated words. Contrary to the schema hypothesis, evidence favoured the null hypothesis of no difference between definition and sentence conditions for related words (Experiment 1), even when each cue was associated with multiple associates, indicating that the associations can be generalized (Experiment 2), or when the schematic information was explicitly re-activated during Relearning (Experiment 3). These results suggest that unitized associations do not generalize to accommodate new information, and therefore provide evidence against the schema account.
dc.format.mediumPrinten
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society Inc.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectAssociation Learningen
dc.subjectGeneralization (Psychology)en
dc.subjectMental Recallen
dc.subjectRecognition (Psychology)en
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titleThe missing link? Testing a schema account of unitization.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1040
prism.issueIdentifier7en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameMemory & cognitionen
prism.startingPage1023
prism.volume46en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.26236
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-04-24en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3758/s13421-018-0819-3en
rioxxterms.versionVoR*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10en
dc.contributor.orcidHenson, Richard [0000-0002-0712-2639]
dc.identifier.eissn1532-5946
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Academy (PF170046)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_UU_00005/8)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International