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dc.contributor.authorOrland, Chloe
dc.contributor.authorEmilson, Erik JS
dc.contributor.authorBasiliko, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorMykytczuk, Nadia CS
dc.contributor.authorGunn, John M
dc.contributor.authorTanentzap, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T12:48:43Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T12:48:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/279574
dc.description.abstractHow ecosystem functioning changes with microbial communities remains an open question in natural ecosystems. Both present-day environmental conditions and historical events, such as past differences in dispersal, can have a greater influence over ecosystem function than the diversity or abundance of both taxa and genes. Here, we estimated how individual and interactive effects of microbial community structure defined by diversity and abundance, present-day environmental conditions, and an indicator of historical legacies influenced ecosystem functioning in lake sediments. We studied sediments because they have strong gradients in all three of these ecosystem properties and deliver important functions worldwide. By characterizing bacterial community composition and functional traits at eight sites fed by discrete and contrasting catchments, we found that taxonomic diversity and the normalized abundance of oxidase-encoding genes explained as much variation in CO2 production as present-day gradients of pH and organic matter quantity and quality. Functional gene diversity was not linked to CO2 production rates. Surprisingly, the effects of taxonomic diversity and normalized oxidase abundance in the model predicting CO2 production were attributable to site-level differences in bacterial communities unrelated to the present-day environment, suggesting that colonization history rather than habitat-based filtering indirectly influenced ecosystem functioning. Our findings add to limited evidence that biodiversity and gene abundance explain patterns of microbiome functioning in nature. Yet we highlight among the first time how these relationships depend directly on present-day environmental conditions and indirectly on historical legacies, and so need to be contextualized with these other ecosystem properties.
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this work came from NERC Standard Grant NE/L006561/1 and Gatsby Fellowship GAT2962 to Andrew J. Tanentzap.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectBacteria
dc.subjectCarbon Dioxide
dc.subjectEnvironmental Microbiology
dc.subjectEcosystem
dc.subjectBiodiversity
dc.subjectModels, Biological
dc.subjectGenetic Variation
dc.subjectLakes
dc.subjectMicrobiota
dc.titleMicrobiome functioning depends on individual and interactive effects of the environment and community structure.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage11
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameISME J
prism.startingPage1
prism.volume13
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.26946
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-20
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41396-018-0230-x
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01
dc.contributor.orcidEmilson, Erik JS [0000-0002-1516-9728]
dc.contributor.orcidTanentzap, Andrew [0000-0002-2883-1901]
dc.identifier.eissn1751-7370
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idNatural Environment Research Council (NE/L006561/1)
cam.issuedOnline2018-07-24
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-01-24


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