Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJarrett, Joeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T22:15:19Z
dc.date.available2018-09-10T22:15:19Z
dc.identifier.issn0021-9371
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/280016
dc.description.abstractIn Hamlet and the Vision of Darkness, Rhodri Lewis argues that Shakespeare’s most famous play should be understood as a violent repudiation of practically every tenet of Renaissance humanism. Aristotle, Cicero, Boethius, Erasmus, and many others, Lewis contends, are permitted to haunt the words spoken in Shakespeare’s Denmark, only so that the ghosts of these thinkers can finally be laid to rest, once and for all. Hamlet himself is presented as a bricolage of this intellectual hall of fame, whose befuddled articulations of conventional wisdoms work precisely to lay bare the toxic nonsensicality and ultimate futility of the mainstream of sixteenth-century intelligence.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.title[Review] Rhodri Lewis. Hamlet and the Vision of Darkness. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2017. Pp. 392. $39.95 (cloth).en
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameJournal of British Studiesen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.27381
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-09-10


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record