Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorÓ hÉigeartaigh, Seán
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-11T17:32:09Z
dc.date.available2018-09-11T17:32:09Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/280193
dc.description.abstractOurs is a resilient species. Around 70,000 years ago our total population may have fallen to between three and ten thousand individuals, possibly due to a supervolcanic eruption (Ambrose 1998) . Yet our ancestors survived, squeezed through the bottleneck, and flourished. But this resilience cannot be taken for granted. We are interconnected and interdependent as never before; the power and scale of our technological capacities are unprecedented. We are in uncharted waters and thus our previous survival is no longer a reason to expect our continued survival (Bostrom 2013). As a result, it is urgent that we develop a systematic understanding of the nature and causes of catastrophic and existential risks.
dc.titleWorking together to face humanity’s greatest threats: Introduction to The Future of Research on Catastrophic and Existential Risk.
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameFutures
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.27560
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
dc.contributor.orcidCurrie, Adrian [0000-0003-2638-202X]
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idTempleton World Charity Foundation (TWCF) (177155)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-09-11


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record