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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, David Ren
dc.contributor.authorPhalan, Benen
dc.contributor.authorFeniuk, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Rhysen
dc.contributor.authorBalmford, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-20T12:06:57Z
dc.date.available2018-09-20T12:06:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-08en
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/280544
dc.description.abstractThe loss of carbon stocks through agricultural land-use change is a key driver of greenhouse gas emissions [1–4] and the methods used to manage agricultural land will have major impacts on the global climate in the 21st century [4–9]. It remains unresolved whether carbon losses would be minimised by increasing farm yields and limiting conversion natural habitats (‘land sparing’) or maximising on-farm carbon stock even at the cost of reduced yields and therefore greater habitat clearance (‘land sharing’). In this paper, we use field surveys of over 11,000 trees, in-depth interviews with farmers, and existing agricultural data, to evaluate the potential impacts of these contrasting approaches, and plausible intermediate strategies, on above-ground carbon stocks across a diverse range of agricultural and natural systems. Our analyses include agroforestry and oil palm plantations in the humid tropics of Ghana; cattle ranching in dry tropical forest in Mexico; and arable cropping in temperate wetlands and forests in Poland. Strikingly, despite the range of systems investigated, land sparing consistently had a higher potential to sustain regional above-ground carbon stocks than any other strategy. This was the case in all three regions, and at all plausible levels of food production, including falls in demand. However, if agricultural production increases to meet likely future demand levels, we project large decreases in above-ground carbon stocks, regardless of land-use strategy. Our results strongly suggest that maintaining aboveground carbon stocks will depend on both limiting future food demand and minimising agricultural expansion through linking high-yield farming with conserving or restoring natural habitats.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectConservation of Natural Resourcesen
dc.subjectAgricultureen
dc.subjectGhanaen
dc.subjectMexicoen
dc.subjectPolanden
dc.subjectCarbon Sequestrationen
dc.titleCarbon Storage and Land-Use Strategies in Agricultural Landscapes across Three Continents.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage2505.e4
prism.issueIdentifier15en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameCurrent biology : CBen
prism.startingPage2500
prism.volume28en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.27912
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-30en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.cub.2018.05.087en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08en
dc.contributor.orcidGreen, Rhys [0000-0001-8690-8914]
dc.contributor.orcidBalmford, Andrew [0000-0002-0144-3589]
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0445
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International