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dc.contributor.authorCooper, Matthew B
dc.contributor.authorKazamia, Elena
dc.contributor.authorHelliwell, Katherine E
dc.contributor.authorKudahl, Ulrich Johan
dc.contributor.authorSayer, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Glen L
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T15:22:09Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T15:22:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/280642
dc.description.abstractOstreococcus tauri, a picoeukaryotic alga that contributes significantly to primary production in oligotrophic waters, has a highly streamlined genome, lacking the genetic capacity to grow without the vitamins thiamine (B1) and cobalamin (B12). Here we demonstrate that the B12 and B1 auxotrophy of O. tauri can be alleviated by co-culturing with a heterotrophic bacterial partner Dinoroseobacter shibae, a member of the Rhodobacteraceae family of alpha-proteobacteria, genera of which are frequently found associated with marine algae. D. shibae lacks the complete pathway to synthesise three other B-vitamins: niacin (B3), biotin (B7), and p-aminobenzoic acid (a precursor for folate, B9), and the alga is in turn able to satisfy the reciprocal vitamin requirements of its bacterial partner in a stable long-term co-culture. Bioinformatics searches of 197 representative marine bacteria with sequenced genomes identified just nine species that had a similar combination of traits (ability to make vitamin B12, but missing one or more genes for niacin and biotin biosynthesis enzymes), all of which were from the Rhodobacteraceae. Further analysis of 70 species from this family revealed the majority encoded the B12 pathway, but only half were able to make niacin, and fewer than 13% biotin. These characteristics may have either contributed to or resulted from the tendency of members of this lineage to adopt lifestyles in close association with algae. This study provides a nuanced view of bacterial-phytoplankton interactions, emphasising the complexity of the sources, sinks and dynamic cycling between marine microbes of these important organic micronutrients.
dc.description.sponsorshipEU FP7
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectPhytoplankton
dc.subjectRhodobacteraceae
dc.subjectNiacin
dc.subjectBiotin
dc.subjectVitamin B 12
dc.subjectVitamin B Complex
dc.subjectThiamine
dc.subjectSymbiosis
dc.subjectHeterotrophic Processes
dc.subjectChlorophyta
dc.titleCross-exchange of B-vitamins underpins a mutualistic interaction between Ostreococcus tauri and Dinoroseobacter shibae.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage345
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameISME J
prism.startingPage334
prism.volume13
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.28008
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-07-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41396-018-0274-y
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02
dc.contributor.orcidSmith, Alison [0000-0001-6511-5704]
dc.identifier.eissn1751-7370
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/I013164/1)
pubs.funder-project-idEconomic and Social Research Council (RES-168-26-0125)
pubs.funder-project-idBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/M011194/1)
pubs.funder-project-idEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/J004847/1)
pubs.funder-project-idRoyal Society (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Commission (317184)
cam.issuedOnline2018-09-18
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-03-18


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