Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFrézal, Lise
dc.contributor.authorDemoinet, Emilie
dc.contributor.authorBraendle, Christian
dc.contributor.authorMiska, Eric
dc.contributor.authorFélix, Marie-Anne
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T15:22:18Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T15:22:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-20
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/280646
dc.description.abstractAlthough heredity mostly relies on the transmission of DNA sequence, additional molecular and cellular features are heritable across several generations. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, insights into such unconventional inheritance result from two lines of work. First, the mortal germline (Mrt) phenotype was defined as a multigenerational phenotype whereby a selfing lineage becomes sterile after several generations, implying multigenerational memory [1, 2]. Second, certain RNAi effects are heritable over several generations in the absence of the initial trigger [3-5]. Both lines of work converged when the subset of Mrt mutants that are heat sensitive were found to closely correspond to mutants defective in the RNAi-inheritance machinery, including histone modifiers [6-9]. Here, we report the surprising finding that several C. elegans wild isolates display a heat-sensitive mortal germline phenotype in laboratory conditions: upon chronic exposure to higher temperatures, such as 25°C, lines reproducibly become sterile after several generations. This phenomenon is reversible, as it can be suppressed by temperature alternations at each generation, suggesting a non-genetic basis for the sterility. We tested whether natural variation in the temperature-induced Mrt phenotype was of genetic nature by building recombinant inbred lines between the isolates MY10 (Mrt) and JU1395 (non-Mrt). Using bulk segregant analysis, we detected two quantitative trait loci. After further recombinant mapping and genome editing, we identified the major causal locus as a polymorphism in the set-24 gene, encoding a SET- and SPK-domain protein. We conclude that C. elegans natural populations may harbor natural genetic variation in epigenetic inheritance phenomena.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCaenorhabditis elegans
dc.subjectEpigenesis, Genetic
dc.subjectFertility
dc.subjectPhenotype
dc.subjectQuantitative Trait Loci
dc.subjectHot Temperature
dc.subjectGenetic Variation
dc.titleNatural Genetic Variation in a Multigenerational Phenotype in C. elegans.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage2596.e8
prism.issueIdentifier16
prism.publicationDate2018
prism.publicationNameCurr Biol
prism.startingPage2588
prism.volume28
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.28012
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-31
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.cub.2018.05.091
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-02
dc.contributor.orcidMiska, Eric [0000-0002-4450-576X]
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0445
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (104640/Z/14/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idCancer Research UK (18583)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (092096/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idCancer Research Uk (None)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (203144/Z/16/Z)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-08-02


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record