Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorZielinski, Arthuren
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorSeshia, Ashwinen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Rodericen
dc.contributor.authorKalberer, Markusen
dc.contributor.authorGiorio, Chiaraen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-29T06:07:22Z
dc.date.available2018-09-29T06:07:22Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-01en
dc.identifier.issn2510-375X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/282880
dc.description.abstractAerosol mass measurements are a key air pollution parameter that is regulated in most countries. Beyond mass measurements, the precise composition of the aerosol is essential in identifying sources and impacts on health and climate. The conventional method for simultaneously quantifying mass and composition is to collect aerosol onto filter or impactor samples followed by laboratory analysis. This approach requires long collection times – providing poor time resolution for mass measurements – and long sample preparation prior to analysis. The first limitation can be circumvented with microresonators, which are novel particulate mass sensors with high mass sensitivities and time resolutions. In addition, direct surface analysis techniques, like liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS), shorten sample preparation times. This work combines, for the first time, the high time resolution mass measurements of a microresonator with the integrated compositional analysis of LESA-MS. Laboratory-produced secondary organic aerosol were collected onto a microresonator via impaction with LESA-MS being used to analyse the chemical composition afterwards. The results were compared with classic filter extraction methods and literature with the final spectra matching the expected reaction products. The combined technique demonstrates an extension to current microresonator applications and illustrates their potential for ambient aerosol studies.
dc.description.sponsorshipNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Sir Winston Churchill Society of Edmonton, Cambridge Trust
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCompositional Analysis of Adsorbed Organic Aerosol on a Microresonator Mass Sensoren
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage129
prism.issueIdentifier3en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameAerosol Science and Engineeringen
prism.startingPage118
prism.volume2en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.24588
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-18en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s41810-018-0029-1en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09-01en
dc.contributor.orcidZielinski, Arthur [0000-0002-2997-2175]
dc.contributor.orcidSeshia, Ashwin [0000-0001-9305-6879]
dc.contributor.orcidJones, Roderic [0000-0002-6761-3966]
dc.contributor.orcidKalberer, Markus [0000-0001-8885-6556]
dc.contributor.orcidGiorio, Chiara [0000-0001-7821-7398]
dc.identifier.eissn2510-3768
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idNERC (NE/K008218/1)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (279405)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International