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dc.contributor.authorSun, Yu
dc.contributor.authorCollinson, Simon L
dc.contributor.authorSuckling, John
dc.contributor.authorSim, Kang
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-18T10:21:25Z
dc.date.available2018-10-18T10:21:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-25
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/284125
dc.description.abstractEmerging evidence suggests that schizophrenia is associated with brain dysconnectivity. Nonetheless, the implicit assumption of stationary functional connectivity (FC) adopted in most previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies raises an open question of schizophrenia-related aberrations in dynamic properties of resting-state FC. This study introduces an empirical method to examine the dynamic functional dysconnectivity in patients with schizophrenia. Temporal brain networks were estimated from resting-state fMRI of 2 independent datasets (patients/controls = 18/19 and 53/57 for self-recorded dataset and a publicly available replication dataset, respectively) by the correlation of sliding time-windowed time courses among regions of a predefined atlas. Through the newly introduced temporal efficiency approach and temporal random network models, we examined, for the first time, the 3D spatiotemporal architecture of the temporal brain network. We found that although prominent temporal small-world properties were revealed in both groups, temporal brain networks of patients with schizophrenia in both datasets showed a significantly higher temporal global efficiency, which cannot be simply attributable to head motion and sampling error. Specifically, we found localized changes of temporal nodal properties in the left frontal, right medial parietal, and subcortical areas that were associated with clinical features of schizophrenia. Our findings demonstrate that altered dynamic FC may underlie abnormal brain function and clinical symptoms observed in schizophrenia. Moreover, we provide new evidence to extend the dysconnectivity hypothesis in schizophrenia from static to dynamic brain network and highlight the potential of aberrant brain dynamic FC in unraveling the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease.
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectNerve Net
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectAtlases as Topic
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectConnectome
dc.titleDynamic Reorganization of Functional Connectivity Reveals Abnormal Temporal Efficiency in Schizophrenia.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage669
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameSchizophr Bull
prism.startingPage659
prism.volume45
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.31496
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/schbul/sby077
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-04
dc.contributor.orcidSuckling, John [0000-0002-5098-1527]
dc.identifier.eissn1745-1701
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2018-06-07
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-06-07


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