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dc.contributor.authorHolness, Marian
dc.contributor.authorClemens, John
dc.contributor.authorVernon, Ron
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-19T11:25:17Z
dc.date.available2018-10-19T11:25:17Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1432-0967
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/284175
dc.description.abstractIn this contribution, we address the vexed question of the extent to which microstructures in granitic rocks reflect their igneous histories or have been masked by later events. Previous works have tended to address the problem either using theoretical or modelling considerations, or by interpretation of observed microstructures. Here we use an approach that integrates the theory of microstructural development and the results of experimental phase-equilibrium studies with direct observation of natural examples on a variety of scales. We show that the predictions of the theoretical and experimental approaches agree perfectly with the mesoscopic and microscopic evidence from granitic rocks themselves. Our conclusion is that although, in many cases, granitic rock microstructures have been modified by near-solidus reactions and crystallisation, in the absence of tectonic deformation the fundamental elements of their igneous heritage remain intact. This means that it is perfectly in order to infer aspects of crystallisation sequences, magmatic reactions and magma flow through careful microstructural observations. Thus, our answer to the question of how deceptive granitic textures are is, in most instances, ‘not very’. However, some undeformed plutons have undergone fluid-driven alteration, and others have been affected by contact metamorphism. Thus, each case should be examined on its own merits.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectGranitic rocks
dc.subjectTextural development
dc.subjectMicrostructure
dc.subjectTextural equilibration
dc.subjectRecrystallisation
dc.subjectTextural modification
dc.titleHow deceptive are microstructures in granitic rocks? Answers from integrated physical theory, phase equilibrium, and direct observations
dc.typeArticle
prism.number62
prism.publicationNameContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
prism.volume173
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.31542
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-17
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00410-018-1488-8
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-06-17
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0967
dc.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00410-018-1488-8
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idNERC (via University of Manchester) (R118242)
pubs.funder-project-idNatural Environment Research Council (NE/N009894/1)
cam.issuedOnline2018-07-20
dc.identifier.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00410-018-1488-8
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:54:11 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International