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dc.contributor.authorLentjes, Marleen
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Ailsa A
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Ruth H
dc.contributor.authorLuben, Robert
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, Kay-Tee
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T00:31:12Z
dc.date.available2018-11-07T00:31:12Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/284708
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Dietary supplements are commonly consumed but may not be beneficial for everyone. It is known that supplement users have healthy behaviour characteristics but until now concordance between spouses living in the same household has not been investigated and concordance may be an important behavioural determinant. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study, cross-sectional data analysis. SETTING: European Prospective Investigation into Cancer in Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk) in the UK, recruitment between 1993 and 1998. SUBJECTS: Married (or living as married) participants sharing a household, who attended a health examination and completed a 7 d diet diary were included in the analysis (n 11 060). The age range was 39-79 years. RESULTS: Nearly 75 % of the households in EPIC-Norfolk were concordant in their supplement use, with 46·7 % not using supplements and 27·0 % using supplements. Concordance increased with age; the percentage of concordant couples varied less by other sociodemographic characteristics. Participants who had a spouse who used a supplement were nearly nine times more likely to use a supplement (unadjusted). Depending on participants' sex and type of supplement used, odds ratios for 'supplement use by spouse' in the prediction of participants' supplement use varied between 6·2 and 11·7 adjusted for participants' age, smoking status, BMI, social class, education level and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: 'Supplement use by spouse' is an independent and the strongest predictor of participants' supplement use. This phenomenon can be useful in the design of studies and health interventions; or when assessing risk of excessive intake from dietary supplements.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectAnticarcinogenic Agents
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectProspective Studies
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectMotor Activity
dc.subjectFamily Relations
dc.subjectSpouses
dc.subjectSex Characteristics
dc.subjectModels, Psychological
dc.subjectDietary Supplements
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectDiet Records
dc.subjectEngland
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.titleOpposites don't attract: high spouse concordance for dietary supplement use in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer in Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk) cohort study.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1066
prism.issueIdentifier6
prism.publicationDate2015
prism.publicationNamePublic Health Nutr
prism.startingPage1060
prism.volume18
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.32080
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-11
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1017/S1368980014001396
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-04
dc.contributor.orcidLentjes, Marleen [0000-0003-4713-907X]
dc.contributor.orcidLuben, Robert [0000-0002-5088-6343]
dc.contributor.orcidKhaw, Kay-Tee [0000-0002-8802-2903]
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2727
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G1000143)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0401527)
cam.issuedOnline2014-07-30
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-04-30


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