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dc.contributor.authorJarrett, Benjaminen
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorHaynes, Hannah Ben
dc.contributor.authorLeaf, Miranda Ren
dc.contributor.authorRebar, Darrenen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Anaen
dc.contributor.authorSchrader, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorKilner, Rebeccaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-17T00:31:22Z
dc.date.available2018-11-17T00:31:22Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-28en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/285364
dc.description.abstractAlthough cooperative social interactions within species are considered an important driver of evolutionary change, few studies have experimentally demonstrated that they cause adaptive evolution. Here we address this problem by studying the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. In this species, parents and larvae work together to obtain nourishment for larvae from the carrion breeding resource: parents feed larvae and larvae also self-feed. We established experimentally evolving populations in which we varied the assistance that parents provided for their offspring and investigated how offspring evolved in response. We show that in populations where parents predictably supplied more care, larval mandibles evolved to be smaller in relation to larval mass, and larvae were correspondingly less self-sufficient. Previous work has shown that antagonistic social interactions can generate escalating evolutionary arms races. Our study shows that cooperative interactions can yield the opposite evolutionary outcome: when one party invests more, the other evolves to invest less.
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Research Council Royal Society
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectMandibleen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectFeeding Behavioren
dc.subjectCooperative Behavioren
dc.subjectAdaptation, Physiologicalen
dc.subjectLarvaen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectBiological Evolutionen
dc.subjectColeopteraen
dc.titleA sustained change in the supply of parental care causes adaptive evolution of offspring morphology.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameNature communicationsen
prism.startingPage3987
prism.volume9en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.32731
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-06en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41467-018-06513-6en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09-28en
dc.contributor.orcidJarrett, Benjamin [0000-0003-2071-6076]
dc.contributor.orcidRebar, Darren [0000-0001-6170-2100]
dc.contributor.orcidKilner, Rebecca [0000-0003-1159-0758]
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (310785)
pubs.funder-project-idRoyal Society (wm140111)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International