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dc.contributor.authorWou, Cen
dc.contributor.authorSilarova, Ben
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorUsher-Smith, Julieten
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-01T00:31:08Z
dc.date.available2018-12-01T00:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-12en
dc.identifier.issn0033-3506
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286212
dc.description.abstractObjectives Many health promotion campaigns and interventions focusing on improving health-related behaviours have been based on targeting response-efficacy. This is based on the assumption that response efficacy is an important modifiable determinant of behaviour change. This study aimed to quantify the association between response efficacy and objective and subjective measures of physical activity and diet. Study design Prospective cohort analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial Methods 953 participants were assessed for response efficacy at baseline and 12 weeks following randomisation to interventions to increase physical activity and improve diet. Subjective measures were collected via a self-report questionnaire which included two questions used to derive the Cambridge Index of physical activity and questions about daily or weekly fruit and vegetable, whole grain, meat and fish intake, based on dietary guidelines to lower cardiovascular risk. Objective measures were quantified using accelerometer and plasma carotenoids. Results The mean change in response efficacy for physical activity was +0.5 (SD 2.0) and for diet was +0.5 (SD 2.1). There were no clinically or statistically significant associations between baseline or change in response efficacy and objective and subjective measures of physical activity or objective measures of diet. There was a small statistically significant association between baseline response efficacy and change in self-reported whole grain consumption, but this is unlikely to be clinically significant. Conclusions Response efficacy is not a fundamental determinant of diet and physical activity and should not be the main focus of interventions targeting these behaviours.
dc.format.mediumPrinten
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subjectHealth Behavioren
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectHealth Promotionen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectSelf Reporten
dc.titleThe associations between the response efficacy and objective and subjective change in physical activity and diet in the Information and Risk Modification trial.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage33
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNamePublic healthen
prism.startingPage26
prism.volume165en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33523
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-07en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.puhe.2018.09.006en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12en
dc.contributor.orcidGriffin, Simon [0000-0002-2157-4797]
dc.contributor.orcidUsher-Smith, Juliet [0000-0002-8501-2531]
dc.identifier.eissn1476-5616
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Commission (279233)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/4)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (NF-SI-0515-10119)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/L003120/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0800270)
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Heart Foundation (RG/13/13/30194)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:53:52 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International