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dc.contributor.authorYau, Amy
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Jean
dc.contributor.authorMonsivais, Pablo
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-04T00:31:20Z
dc.date.available2018-12-04T00:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-07
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286271
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Little is known about time trends in diet quality and associated inequalities in the UK. This study aimed to examine trends in adherence to four UK dietary recommendations, overall and among sociodemographic subgroups, from 1986 to 2012. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We conducted a repeated cross-sectional analysis using data from three UK diet surveys: Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults 1986-87 (n = 2018), National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) 2000-01 (n = 1683) and NDNS Rolling Programme 2008-12 (n = 1632). We measured adherence to dietary recommendations for fruit and vegetables, salt, oily fish, and red and processed meat, estimated using food diary record data. We compared adherence across surveys and by four sociodemographic characteristics: sex, age, socioeconomic position and ethnicity. RESULTS: Overall, population adherence to dietary recommendations was low to moderate, but improved over time. There were inequalities in adherence to all recommendations at all timepoints according to one or more sociodemographic characteristic. When inequalities were present, women, older adults, those with non-manual occupations and non-Whites were more likely to adhere to dietary recommendations. Although some dietary inequalities declined, most persisted across the three surveys. CONCLUSIONS: The persistence of most inequalities highlights the need for further interventions to reduce dietary inequalities as well as improve overall population diet. The greatest simultaneous improvement in population adherence and reduction of inequalities was observed for salt, which may reflect the success of the UK Salt Reduction Programme. Similarly comprehensive programmes should be encouraged for other dietary components.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMalnutrition
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectNutrition Surveys
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectDemography
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectGuideline Adherence
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.titleTime trends in adherence to UK dietary recommendations and associated sociodemographic inequalities, 1986-2012: a repeated cross-sectional analysis.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1005
prism.issueIdentifier7
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameEur J Clin Nutr
prism.startingPage997
prism.volume73
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33583
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41430-018-0347-z
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07
dc.contributor.orcidYau, Amy [0000-0001-8889-523X]
dc.contributor.orcidAdams, Jean [0000-0002-5733-7830]
dc.contributor.orcidMonsivais, Pablo [0000-0002-7088-6674]
dc.identifier.eissn1476-5640
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (087636/Z/08/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idEconomic and Social Research Council (ES/G007462/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MR/K023187/1)
cam.issuedOnline2018-11-16
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-11-16


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