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dc.contributor.authorAraújo, João
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorCastro-Caldas, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorGoswami, Usha
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-05T00:30:52Z
dc.date.available2018-12-05T00:30:52Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286315
dc.description.abstractThe temporal modulation structure of speech plays a key role in neural encoding of the speech signal. Amplitude modulations (AMs, quasi-rhythmic changes in signal energy or intensity) in speech are encoded by neuronal oscillations (rhythmic variations in neural excitability in large cell networks) that oscillate at matching temporal rates. To date, however, all neural studies have investigated adult-directed speech (ADS) as produced and perceived by highly literate adults. Whether temporal features of ADS vary with the skills of the speaker, for example literacy skills, is currently unknown. Here we analyse the temporal structure of ADS spoken by illiterate, low literate (≤ 4 years of literacy) and highly literate (≥ 12 years of literacy) adults. We find that illiterates produce speech differently. Spontaneous conversational speech produced by illiterate adults showed significantly less synchronised coupling between AM bands (less phase synchronisation) than conversational speech produced by low literate and highly literate adults, and contained significantly fewer syllables per second. There was also a significant relationship between years of literacy and the amount of theta-band energy in conversational speech. When asked to produce rhythmic proverbs learned in childhood, all groups could produce speech with similar AM phase synchronisation, suggesting that the differences in spontaneous conversational speech were not caused by physiological constraints. The data suggest that the temporal modulation structure of spoken language changes with the acquisition of cultural skills like literacy that are usually a product of schooling. There is a cultural effect on the temporal modulation structure of spoken language.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectTemporal Lobe
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectDyslexia
dc.subjectSpeech
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectSpeech Perception
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectLiteracy
dc.titleThe temporal modulation structure of illiterate versus literate adult speech.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier10
prism.publicationDate2018
prism.publicationNamePLoS One
prism.startingPagee0205224
prism.volume13
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33625
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-21
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0205224
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01
dc.contributor.orcidAraújo, João [0000-0003-1061-0569]
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0902375)
cam.issuedOnline2018-10-24


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International