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dc.contributor.authorCHENG, SHU FANG
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T09:15:49Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T09:15:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-20
dc.date.submitted2018-12-14
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286440
dc.description.abstractThe Grand Khitan Empire (AD 907-1125) was created by expanding its territory through military conquest and diplomatic treaty across parts of Asia. By deliberate political strategies of cultural construction and the materialization of ethnic ideology, Khitan leaders maintained a multi-ethnic social fabric, consolidated their imperial power, made the ethnic Khitan distinct with the rise of their state, and ultimately proclaimed a hegemony in Northeast Asia. This thesis presents an analysis of 48 tombs categorized into four groups based on the social rank, ethnicity and source of power of the tomb occupants, who include the Khitan emperor, Khitan hereditary aristocracy, non-Khitan hereditary aristocracy and non-hereditary elites. The evolution and chronological patterns of each tomb category are examined and compared to identify the sources of power that underlie ethnic identity and supports the suggestion that imperial acts were manipulated for the consolidation of power. The thesis thus questions the validity of traditional assumptions about ethnic markers – specifically that there was no one-to-one straightforward relation between material culture and ethnicity. The material cultural boundary can be seen as the consequence of social interaction. In addition, it is also clear that the alteration of imperial titles was a political act. Imperial titles of ‘Khitan’, ‘Grand Khitan’, ‘Khitan State’ and ‘Qara Khitan’ accentuate the governing body of ethnic Khitan. In contrast, the titles ‘Liao’ or ‘Great Liao’ were used to symbolize a nation of all the people with the intent of creating a more unified community in the understatement of ethnic differentiation. Overall, archaeological data indicates that an ethno-political strategy highlighted the ruling body (ethnic Khitan) and the largest proportion of the ruled (ethnic Chinese). However, as it privileged ethnic Chinese, it simultaneously marginalized the remaining ethnic minorities, which subsequently lead to a revolt by ethnic Jurchen and the downfall of the Khitan Empire.
dc.formatthesisaccessconfirmationform
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectLiao Dynasty
dc.subjectNomad
dc.subjectEthnic Khitan
dc.subjectKhitan Empire
dc.titleEthnic Identity and the Consolidation of Imperial Power in the Grand Khitan Empire (AD 907-1125) Burial Art as Evidence for Ethnogenesis in a Multi-ethnic Society
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.publisher.departmentArchaeology
dc.date.updated2018-12-07T08:43:03Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33749
dc.type.qualificationtitlePhD in Archaeology
cam.supervisorPETRIE, CAMERON ANDREW
cam.thesis.fundingfalse
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2400-01-01


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