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dc.contributor.authorChaudhary, L.
dc.contributor.authorRubin, J.
dc.contributor.authorIyer, S.
dc.contributor.authorShrivastava, A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T15:00:46Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T15:00:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-01
dc.identifier.otherCWPE1855
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286498
dc.description.abstractWe conduct a public goods game in three small towns in the Indian state of Rajasthan. Due to historical military conquest, until 1947 these towns were on opposite sides of a colonial border separating British India from the Princely States. Our research design offers a treatment comparison between the towns of (British) Kekri and (Princely) Sarwar, and a control comparison between Princely Sarwar and Shahpura. We find that participants from (British) Kekri are more co-operative in mixed-town groups. The differences are driven by individuals with family ties to the towns, highlighting the enduring effects of colonial rule on co-operation norms.
dc.publisherFaculty of Economics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Working Papers in Economics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectcultural transmission
dc.subjectcolonialism
dc.subjectpublic goods game
dc.subjectnatural experiment
dc.subjectlab-in-the- eld experiment
dc.subjectIndia
dc.titleCulture and Colonial Legacy: Evidence from Public Goods Games
dc.typeWorking Paper
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33808


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