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dc.contributor.authorPappas, I
dc.contributor.authorAdapa, RM
dc.contributor.authorMenon, DK
dc.contributor.authorStamatakis, EA
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T00:30:35Z
dc.date.available2018-12-11T00:30:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-01
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286608
dc.description.abstractThe precise mechanism of anaesthetic action on a neural level remains unclear. Recent approaches suggest that anaesthetics attenuate the complexity of interactions (connectivity) however evidence remains insufficient. We used tools from network and information theory to show that, during propofol-induced sedation, a collection of brain regions displayed decreased complexity in their connectivity patterns, especially so if they were sparsely connected. Strikingly, we found that, despite their low connectivity strengths, these regions exhibited an inordinate role in network integration. Their location and connectivity complexity delineated a specific pattern of sparse interactions mainly involving default mode regions while their connectivity complexity during the awake state also correlated with reaction times during sedation signifying its importance as a reliable indicator of the effects of sedation on individuals. Contrary to established views suggesting sedation affects only richly connected brain regions, we propose that suppressed complexity of sparsely connected regions should be considered a critical feature of any candidate mechanistic description for loss of consciousness.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectNeural Pathways
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPropofol
dc.subjectAnesthetics, Intravenous
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectBrain Mapping
dc.subjectInformation Theory
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.titleBrain network disintegration during sedation is mediated by the complexity of sparsely connected regions.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage233
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameNeuroimage
prism.startingPage221
prism.volume186
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33920
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-29
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.10.078
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02
dc.contributor.orcidPappas, Ioannis [0000-0002-0168-7014]
dc.contributor.orcidMenon, David [0000-0002-3228-9692]
dc.contributor.orcidStamatakis, Emmanuel [0000-0001-6955-9601]
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9572
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (083660/Z/07/Z)
cam.issuedOnline2018-11


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International