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dc.contributor.authorBunn, Frances
dc.contributor.authorBurn, Anne-Marie
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Claire
dc.contributor.authorRait, Greta
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Sam
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Louise
dc.contributor.authorSchoeman, Johan
dc.contributor.authorBrayne, Carol
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-20T00:31:31Z
dc.date.available2018-12-20T00:31:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-31
dc.identifier.issn1741-7015
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/287249
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that amongst people with dementia there is a high prevalence of comorbid medical conditions and related complaints. The presence of dementia may complicate clinical care for other conditions and undermine a patient's ability to manage a chronic condition. The aim of this study was to scope the extent, range and nature of research activity around dementia and comorbidity. METHODS: We undertook a scoping review including all types of research relating to the prevalence of comorbidities in people with dementia; current systems, structures and other issues relating to service organisation and delivery; patient and carer experiences; and the experiences and attitudes of service providers. We searched AMED, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PubMed, NHS Evidence, Scopus, Google Scholar (searched 2012, Pubmed updated 2013), checked reference lists and performed citation searches on PubMed and Google Scholar (ongoing to February 2014). RESULTS: We included 54 primary studies, eight reviews and three guidelines. Much of the available literature relates to the prevalence of comorbidities in people with dementia or issues around quality of care. Less is known about service organisation and delivery or the views and experiences of people with dementia and their family carers. There is some evidence that people with dementia did not have the same access to treatment and monitoring for conditions such as visual impairment and diabetes as those with similar comorbidities but without dementia. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of comorbid conditions in people with dementia is high. Whilst current evidence suggests that people with dementia may have poorer access to services the reasons for this are not clear. There is a need for more research looking at the ways in which having dementia impacts on clinical care for other conditions and how the process of care and different services are adapting to the needs of people with dementia and comorbidity. People with dementia should be included in the debate about the management of comorbidities in older populations and there needs to be greater consideration given to including them in studies that focus on age-related healthcare issues.
dc.format.mediumElectronic
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectVision Disorders
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectDisease Management
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectStroke
dc.titleComorbidity and dementia: a scoping review of the literature.
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2014
prism.publicationNameBMC Med
prism.startingPage192
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.34556
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09-26
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s12916-014-0192-4
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-10-31
dc.contributor.orcidBurn, Anne-Marie [0000-0002-0637-2118]
dc.contributor.orcidBrayne, Carol [0000-0001-5307-663X]
dc.identifier.eissn1741-7015
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2014-10-31


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International