Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSamuel, Steven
dc.contributor.authorLegg, Edward W
dc.contributor.authorLurz, Robert
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-08T00:30:21Z
dc.date.available2019-01-08T00:30:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.identifier.issn2054-5703
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/287584
dc.description.abstractHumans are often considered egocentric creatures, particularly (and ironically) when we are supposed to take another person's perspective over our own (i.e. when we use our theory of mind). We investigated the underlying causes of this phenomenon. We gave young adult participants a false belief task (Sandbox Task) in which objects were first hidden at one location by a protagonist and then moved to a second location within the same space but in the protagonist's absence. Participants were asked to indicate either where the protagonist remembered the item to be (reasoning about another's memory), believed it to be (reasoning about another's false belief), or where the protagonist would look for it (action prediction of another based on false belief). The distance away from Location A (the original one) towards Location B (the new location) was our measure of egocentric bias. We found no evidence that egocentric bias varied according to reasoning type, and no evidence that participants actually were more biased when reasoning about another person than when simply recalling the first location from memory. We conclude that the Sandbox Task paradigm may not be sensitive enough to draw out consistent effects related to mental state reasoning in young adults.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by an ESRC grant (ES/M008460/1: PI = NSC) (and by a Leverhulme grant (RPG-2014-353: PI = NSC) (EL and NSC).
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe unreliability of egocentric bias across self-other and memory-belief distinctions in the Sandbox Task.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier11
prism.publicationDate2018
prism.publicationNameR Soc Open Sci
prism.startingPage181355
prism.volume5
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.34897
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-02
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rsos.181355
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-11-07
dc.contributor.orcidSamuel, Steven [0000-0001-7776-7427]
dc.contributor.orcidLegg, Edward W [0000-0003-0353-7105]
dc.contributor.orcidClayton, Nicola [0000-0003-1835-423X]
dc.identifier.eissn2054-5703
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idEconomic and Social Research Council (ES/M008460/1)
pubs.funder-project-idLeverhulme Trust (RPG-2014-353)
cam.issuedOnline2018-11-07


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International