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dc.contributor.authorLawton, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Men
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Den
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Fen
dc.contributor.authorLeelarathna, Len
dc.contributor.authorTauschmann, Men
dc.contributor.authorThabit, Hen
dc.contributor.authorWilinska, Malgorzataen
dc.contributor.authorHovorka, Romanen
dc.contributor.authorAPCam11 Consortium,en
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-08T00:31:06Z
dc.date.available2019-01-08T00:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2019-06en
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/287610
dc.description.abstractAim: While closed-loop systems are being developed to lessen the burden of diabetes self-management and improve glycaemic control, there may be unintended consequences to using this technology We explored whether, how, and why, moving onto and using a hybrid day-and-night closed-loop system affected people’s food choices and dietary practices to better understand the impact of this technology on everyday life and help inform recommendations for training and support given to future users. Methods: 24 adults, adolescents and parents were interviewed before commencing use of the closed-loop system and following its three-month use. Data were analysed thematically and longitudinally. Results: While participants described preparing and/or eating similar meals to those consumed prior to using a closed-loop, many described feeling more normal and less burdened by diabetes in dietary situations. Individuals also noted how use of this technology could lead to deskilling (less precise carbohydrate counting) and less healthy eating (increased snacking, portion sizes and consumption of fatty, energy dense foods), due to the perceived ability of the system to deal with errors in carbohydrate counting and address small rises in blood glucose without a corrective dose needing to be administered. Conclusions: While there may be quality of life benefits to using a closed-loop individuals might benefit from additional nutritional and behavioural education to help promote healthy eating. Refresher training in carbohydrate counting may also be necessary to help ensure users are able to undertake diabetes management in situations where the technology might fail or they take a break from using it.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.subjectAPCam11 Consortiumen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1en
dc.subjectInsulinen
dc.subjectBlood Glucoseen
dc.subjectBlood Glucose Self-Monitoringen
dc.subjectInsulin Infusion Systemsen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subjectFeeding Behavioren
dc.subjectFood Preferencesen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectChoice Behavioren
dc.subjectQualitative Researchen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.titleThe impact of using a closed-loop system on food choices and eating practices among people with Type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study involving adults, teenagers and parents.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage760
prism.issueIdentifier6en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameDiabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Associationen
prism.startingPage753
prism.volume36en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.34922
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-18en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/dme.13887en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-06en
dc.contributor.orcidLawton, J [0000-0002-8016-7374]
dc.contributor.orcidRankin, D [0000-0002-5835-3402]
dc.contributor.orcidLeelarathna, L [0000-0001-9602-1962]
dc.contributor.orcidThabit, H [0000-0001-6076-6997]
dc.contributor.orcidWilinska, Malgorzata [0000-0003-2739-1753]
dc.contributor.orcidHovorka, Roman [0000-0003-2901-461X]
dc.identifier.eissn1464-5491
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146281)
pubs.funder-project-idJuvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Ltd (JDRF) (2-SRA-2014-256-M-R)
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) (UC4DK108520)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-12-21


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