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dc.contributor.authorJust, Alanna Len
dc.contributor.authorMeng, Chunen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Dana Gen
dc.contributor.authorBullmore, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevoren
dc.contributor.authorErsche, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T00:30:23Z
dc.date.available2019-01-25T00:30:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-04en
dc.identifier.issn2158-3188
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/288401
dc.description.abstractThe association between stimulant drug use and aberrant reward processing is well-documented in the literature, but the nature of these abnormalities remains elusive. The present study aims to disentangle the separate and interacting effects of stimulant drug use and pre-existing familial risk on abnormal reward processing associated with stimulant drug addiction. We used the Monetary Incentive Delay task, a well-validated measure of reward-processing, during fMRI scanning in four distinct groups: individuals with familial risk who were either stimulant drug-dependent (N=41) or had never used stimulant drugs (N=46); and individuals without familial risk who were either using stimulant drugs (N=25) or not (N=48). We first examined task-related whole-brain activation followed by a psychophysiological interaction analysis to further explore brain functional connectivity. For analyses, we used a univariate model with two fixed factors (familial risk and stimulant drug use). Our results showed increased task-related activation in the putamen and motor cortex of stimulant-using participants. We also found altered task-related functional connectivity between the putamen and frontal regions in participants with a familial risk (irrespective of whether they were using stimulant drugs or not). Additionally, we identified an interaction between stimulant drug use and familial risk in task-related functional connectivity between the putamen and motor-related cortical regions in potentially at-risk individuals. Our findings suggest that abnormal task-related activation in motor brain systems is associated with regular stimulant drug use, whereas abnormal task-related functional connectivity in frontostriatal brain systems in individuals with familial risk may indicate pre-existing neural vulnerability for developing addiction.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by a Medical Research Council (MRC) grant (G0701497), and conducted within the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (BCNI), which is jointly funded by the MRC and Wellcome Trust. ALJ was supported by the Gates Cambridge Trust, DGS by a studentship from the Cambridge Overseas Trust, and CM by the Wellcome Trust (105602/Z/14/Z) and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. TWR is supported by Wellcome Trust (104631/z/14/z).
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPutamenen
dc.subjectMotor Cortexen
dc.subjectPrefrontal Cortexen
dc.subjectNerve Neten
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectSubstance-Related Disordersen
dc.subjectGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subjectCentral Nervous System Stimulantsen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectSiblingsen
dc.subjectRewarden
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.subjectAnticipation, Psychologicalen
dc.subjectConnectomeen
dc.titleEffects of familial risk and stimulant drug use on the anticipation of monetary reward: an fMRI study.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameTranslational psychiatryen
prism.startingPage65
prism.volume9en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.35699
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-09en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41398-019-0399-4en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02-04en
dc.contributor.orcidMeng, Chun [0000-0003-0145-6627]
dc.contributor.orcidBullmore, Edward [0000-0002-8955-8283]
dc.contributor.orcidRobbins, Trevor [0000-0003-0642-5977]
dc.contributor.orcidErsche, Karen [0000-0002-3203-1878]
dc.identifier.eissn2158-3188
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0701497)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/J012084/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000183)
pubs.funder-project-idWELLCOME TRUST (105602/Z/14/Z)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:53:38 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International