Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCarey, Rachel N
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Lauren E
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Marie
dc.contributor.authorRothman, Alexander J
dc.contributor.authorde Bruin, Marijn
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Michael P
dc.contributor.authorMichie, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-08T00:33:07Z
dc.date.available2019-02-08T00:33:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-17
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/288995
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Despite advances in behavioral science, there is no widely shared understanding of the "mechanisms of action" (MoAs) through which individual behavior change techniques (BCTs) have their effects. Cumulative progress in the development, evaluation, and synthesis of behavioral interventions could be improved by identifying the MoAs through which BCTs are believed to bring about change. PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify the links between BCTs and MoAs described by authors of a corpus of published literature. METHODS: Hypothesized links between BCTs and MoAs were extracted by two coders from 277 behavior change intervention articles. Binomial tests were conducted to provide an indication of the relative frequency of each link. RESULTS: Of 77 BCTs coded, 70 were linked to at least one MoA. Of 26 MoAs, all but one were linked to at least one BCT. We identified 2,636 BCT-MoA links in total (mean number of links per article = 9.56, SD = 13.80). The most frequently linked MoAs were "Beliefs about Capabilities" and "Intention." Binomial test results identified up to five MoAs linked to each of the BCTs (M = 1.71, range: 1-5) and up to eight BCTs for each of the MoAs (M = 3.63, range: 1-8). CONCLUSIONS: The BCT-MoA links described by intervention authors and identified in this extensive review present intervention developers and reviewers with a first level of systematically collated evidence. These findings provide a resource for the development of theory-based interventions, and for theoretical understanding of intervention evaluations. The extent to which these links are empirically supported requires systematic investigation.
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPsychological Theory
dc.subjectBehavior Therapy
dc.titleBehavior Change Techniques and Their Mechanisms of Action: A Synthesis of Links Described in Published Intervention Literature.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage707
prism.issueIdentifier8
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameAnn Behav Med
prism.startingPage693
prism.volume53
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.36258
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/abm/kay078
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07
dc.contributor.orcidKelly, Mike [0000-0002-2029-5841]
dc.identifier.eissn1532-4796
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2018-10-10


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International