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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Joeen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-12T00:31:49Z
dc.date.available2019-02-12T00:31:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-01en
dc.identifier.issn0003-3804
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/289206
dc.description.abstractWhen Mildred Spiewak Dresselhaus (figure 1) passed away in February 2017, she left behind an indelible legacy. The “Queen of Carbon,” as she was known, pioneered the physical study of the sixth element well before the keen attention attracted by buckyballs and nanotubes. Her groundwork ensured that when Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov isolated and characterized graphene, they were a shoe-in for the Nobel Prize, which they took home in 2010. Dresselhaus also earned renown for her advocacy on behalf of women in science. She was the first woman to be honored with the title of Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and she pioneered leadership roles for women in many of the professional societies and organizations to which she belonged. Here, I focus on a less noted (though no less noteworthy) aspect of her legacy: her influence as a pedagogue.
dc.publisherWiley - VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KG
dc.titleMildred Dresselhaus and Solid State Pedagogy at MITen
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier10en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameAnnalen der Physiken
prism.volume531en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.36468
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-28en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/andp.201900274en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-10-01en
dc.contributor.orcidMartin, Joseph Daniel [0000-0002-8591-2150]
dc.identifier.eissn1521-3889
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 10:51:10 GMT 2020 - Embargo updated*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-10-01


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