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dc.contributor.authorGariboldi, Maria Isabellaen
dc.contributor.authorButler, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorBest, Serenaen
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Ruthen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T10:31:06Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T10:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/290378
dc.description.abstractOne of the greatest obstacles to clinical translation of bone tissue engineering is the inability to effectively and efficiently vascularize scaffolds. The goal of this work was to explore systematically whether architecture, at a scale of hundreds of microns, can be used to direct the growth of microcapillary-like structures into the core of scaffolds. Biphasic bioceramic patterned architectures were produced using silicone molds of 3D printed parts. Grooves and ridges were designed to have widths of 330 μm and 660 μm, with periodicities respectively of 1240 μm and 630 μm. Groove depth was varied between 150 μm and 585 μm. Co-cultures of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) and human osteoblasts (hOBs) were used to grow microcapillary-like structures on substrates. Bioceramic architecture was found to significantly affect microcapillary-like structure location and orientation. Microcapillary-like structures were found to form predominantly in grooves or between convexities. For all patterned samples, the CD31 (endothelial cell marker) signal was at least 2.5 times higher along grooves versus perpendicular to grooves. In addition, the average signal was at least two times higher within grooves than outside grooves for all samples. Grooves with a width of 330 μm and a depth of 300 μm resulted in the formation of individual, highly aligned microcapillary-like structures with lengths around 5 mm. Extensive literature has focused on the role of nano- and micro-topography (on the scale below tens of microns) on cellular response. However, the idea that architecture at a scale much larger than a cell could be used to modulate angiogenesis has not been systematically investigated. This work shows the crucial influence of architecture on microcapillary-like structure self-assembly at the scale of hundreds of microns. Elucidating the precise correspondence between architecture and microcapillary-like structure organization will ultimately allow the engineering of microvasculature by tuning local scaffold design to achieve desirable microvessel properties.
dc.description.sponsorshipM.I.G. gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Gates Cambridge Trust and Geistlich Pharma AG. S.M.B. and R.E.C. are funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Established Career Fellowship Grant No. EP/N019938/1.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleEngineering vasculature: Architectural effects on microcapillary-like structure self-assembly.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage13
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.numbere0210390en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNamePLoS Oneen
prism.startingPage1
prism.volume14en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.37608
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-21en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0210390en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019en
dc.contributor.orcidButler, Richard [0000-0002-3885-1332]
dc.contributor.orcidBest, Serena [0000-0001-7866-8607]
dc.contributor.orcidCameron, Ruth [0000-0003-1573-4923]
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEPSRC (EP/N019938/1)
cam.issuedOnline2019-01-08en
datacite.issupplementedby.doi10.17863/CAM.32006en


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International