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dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Ellaen
dc.contributor.editorLand, MKen
dc.contributor.editorAronson, JDen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-22T14:22:35Z
dc.date.available2019-03-22T14:22:35Z
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.isbn9781316838952en
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/290768
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter, I argue that, while the rise of ICTs has certainly created new opportunities, it has also created new risk – or negative outcomes – for human rights practitioners. This risk is silencing, and unequally so. The chapter begins by outlining how risk is entwined with communication in the digital age. Rather than considering risk in isolation, we can think of it as manifesting via “risk assemblages,” or dynamic combinations of actors, technologies, contexts, resources, and risk perceptions (Lupton, 2016). In the subsequent two sections, I detail selected types of risk for human rights communication resulting from new combinations of actors and technologies involved in digital fact-finding and advocacy. For fact-finding, these include the risk of surveillance, which has consequences for participants’ physical security, and the risk of deception, which has consequences for their reputational integrity. For advocacy, these include the risk of mistakes, which can in turn risk reputational integrity, and the risk of miscalculations, which can jeopardize precious resources. In the following section, I explain how this materialized risk combines with risk perceptions to create a silencing double bind. Human rights practitioners may be silenced if they don’t know about risk – and they may silence themselves if they do. This silencing effect is not universal, however, but disproportionately affects human rights practitioners situated in more precarious contexts and with less access to resources, with ensuing consequence for the pluralism of human rights reporting. The chapter finishes by outlining four ways of loosening the risk double bind: educational, technological, reflexive, and discursive approaches to working with risk.en
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.subjectsocial mediaen
dc.subjectpluralismen
dc.subjectrisken
dc.subjectcommunication risken
dc.subjectadvocacyen
dc.subjectfact-findingen
dc.subjectinformation and communication technologiesen
dc.subjectICT4Den
dc.subjectsociology of technologyen
dc.titleRisk and the Pluralism of Digital Human Rights Fact-Finding and Advocacyen
dc.typeBook chapter
prism.endingPage214
prism.number9en
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameNew Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practiceen
prism.startingPage188
prism.volumePart II - Technology and Human Rights Enforcementen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.16915
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1017/9781316838952.009en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018en
dc.contributor.orcidMcPherson, Ella [0000-0001-9207-1655]
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren
pubs.funder-project-idIsaac Newton Trust (1208(J))
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (ES/K009850/1)
cam.issuedOnline2018-04-01en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/books/new-technologies-for-human-rights-law-and-practice/risk-and-the-pluralism-of-digital-human-rights-factfinding-and-advocacy/FBF030B438D1F6CB7631C533A8A99D41en
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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