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dc.contributor.authorKarkey, Abhilasha
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, Niva
dc.contributor.authorChalise, Shiva
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, Suchita
dc.contributor.authorShrestha, Shrijana
dc.contributor.authorThi Nguyen, To Nguyen
dc.contributor.authorDongol, Sabina
dc.contributor.authorBasnyat, Buddha
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorBoinett, Christine J
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-10T23:30:23Z
dc.date.available2019-04-10T23:30:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-01
dc.identifier.issn0035-9203
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/291416
dc.description.abstractBackground: Human infections with Serratia spp. are generally limited to Serratia marcescens and the Serratia liquefaciens complex. There is little data regarding the infections caused by the remaining Serratia spp., as they are seldom isolated from clinical specimens. Methods: In this health care setting in Kathmandu, Nepal routine blood culture is performed on all febrile patients with a temperature >38°C or when there is clinical suspicion of bacteremia. During 2015 we atypically isolated and identified several Serratia spp. We extracted clinical data from these cases and performed whole genome sequencing on all isolates using a MiSeq system (Ilumina, San Diego, CA, USA). Results: Between June and November 2015, we identified eight patients with suspected bacteremia that produced a positive blood culture for Serratia spp., six Serratia rubidaea and five Serratia marcescens. The S. rubidaea were isolated from three neonates and were concentrated in the neonatal intensive care unit between June and July 2015. All patients were severely ill and one patient died. Whole genome sequencing confirmed that six Nepalese S. rubidaea sequences were identical and indicative of a single-source outbreak. Conclusions: Despite extensive screening we were unable to identify the source of the outbreak, but the inferred timeline suggested that these atypical infections were associated with the aftermath of two massive earthquakes. We speculate that deficits in hygienic behavior, combined with a lack of standard infection control, in the post-earthquake emergency situation contributed to these unusual Serratia spp. outbreaks.
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectSerratia
dc.subjectSerratia marcescens
dc.subjectSerratia Infections
dc.subjectCross Infection
dc.subjectMicrobial Sensitivity Tests
dc.subjectInfection Control
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subjectInfant, Premature
dc.subjectIntensive Care Units, Neonatal
dc.subjectNepal
dc.subjectEarthquakes
dc.titleOutbreaks of Serratia marcescens and Serratia rubidaea bacteremia in a central Kathmandu hospital following the 2015 earthquakes.
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage472
prism.issueIdentifier10
prism.publicationDate2018
prism.publicationNameTrans R Soc Trop Med Hyg
prism.startingPage467
prism.volume112
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.38585
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-06-30
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/trstmh/try077
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10
dc.contributor.orcidBaker, Stephen [0000-0003-1308-5755]
dc.identifier.eissn1878-3503
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (106158/Z/14/Z)
cam.issuedOnline2018-08-11


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International