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dc.contributor.authorLee, Chi-Ying
dc.contributor.authorPike, David A
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Hui-Yun
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Jung-Ya
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Shiang-Lin
dc.contributor.authorShaner, Pei-Jen L
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Chen-Pan
dc.contributor.authorManica, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Wen-San
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T23:30:43Z
dc.date.available2019-06-20T23:30:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293782
dc.description.abstractPhylogenetic analysis has shown that males' propensity to engage in aggressive encounters is associated with females having greater longevity. Here, we confirm the causal link between aggression and reduced longevity by looking at an egg-eating snake (Oligodon formosanus) in which females defend territories in the presence of sea turtle eggs. We monitored aggressiveness and survival at two sites: a control site with a stable supply of turtle eggs, and a second site where we collected data before and after a storm that eroded the beach on which turtles nested, thus leading to a loss of territoriality. We show that territoriality was the driver behind higher injury rates in females. Territorial females also had lower survival and decreased longevity compared with the nonterritorial males, but these differences disappeared when females were not territorial. Our study demonstrates how resource availability can influence the evolution of sex-specific patterns of survival across vertebrates.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectSnakes
dc.subjectBody Weight
dc.subjectWeight Gain
dc.subjectSocial Behavior
dc.subjectTerritoriality
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectLongevity
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.titleWhen males live longer: Resource-driven territorial behavior drives sex-specific survival in snakes.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationDate2019
prism.publicationNameSci Adv
prism.startingPageeaar5478
prism.volume5
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.40895
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-03-12
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1126/sciadv.aar5478
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-04-24
dc.contributor.orcidLee, Chi-Ying [0000-0002-9591-1370]
dc.contributor.orcidPike, David A [0000-0002-6121-5449]
dc.contributor.orcidHuang, Shiang-Lin [0000-0002-6133-4851]
dc.contributor.orcidShaner, Pei-Jen L [0000-0001-8112-4299]
dc.contributor.orcidManica, Andrea [0000-0003-1895-450X]
dc.contributor.orcidHuang, Wen-San [0000-0003-0073-3557]
dc.identifier.eissn2375-2548
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2019-04-24


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International