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dc.contributor.authorCharalambous, M
dc.contributor.authorBhatti, SFM
dc.contributor.authorVan Ham, L
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, S
dc.contributor.authorJeffery, ND
dc.contributor.authorTipold, A
dc.contributor.authorSiedenburg, J
dc.contributor.authorVolk, HA
dc.contributor.authorHasegawa, D
dc.contributor.authorGallucci, A
dc.contributor.authorGandini, G
dc.contributor.authorMusteata, M
dc.contributor.authorIves, E
dc.contributor.authorVanhaesebrouck, AE
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-03T23:30:05Z
dc.date.available2019-07-03T23:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.issn0891-6640
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/294323
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines has shown superiority over rectal administration for terminating emergency epileptic seizures in human trials. No such clinical trials have been performed in dogs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intranasal midazolam (IN-MDZ), via a mucosal atomization device, as a first-line management option for canine status epilepticus and compare it to rectal administration of diazepam (R-DZP) for controlling status epilepticus before intravenous access is available. ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs with idiopathic or structural epilepsy manifesting status epilepticus within a hospital environment were used. Dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with IN-MDZ (n = 20) or R-DZP (n = 15). METHODS: Randomized parallel-group clinical trial. Seizure cessation time and adverse effects were recorded. For each dog, treatment was considered successful if the seizure ceased within 5 minutes and did not recur within 10 minutes after administration. The 95% confidence interval was used to detect the true population of dogs that were successfully treated. The Fisher's 2-tailed exact test was used to compare the 2 groups, and the results were considered statistically significant if P < .05. RESULTS: IN-MDZ and R-DZP terminated status epilepticus in 70% (14/20) and 20% (3/15) of cases, respectively (P = .0059). All dogs showed sedation and ataxia. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: IN-MDZ is a quick, safe and effective first-line medication for controlling status epilepticus in dogs and appears superior to R-DZP. IN-MDZ might be a valuable treatment option when intravenous access is not available and for treatment of status epilepticus in dogs at home.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleIntranasal Midazolam versus Rectal Diazepam for the Management of Canine Status Epilepticus: A Multicenter Randomized Parallel-Group Clinical Trial.
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationDate2017
prism.publicationNameJ Vet Intern Med
prism.volume31
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.41422
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-04-12
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/jvim.14734
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-07-13
dc.contributor.orcidCharalambous, M [0000-0002-6964-6307]
dc.contributor.orcidSiedenburg, J [0000-0002-6993-4720]
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1676
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2017-05-24


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International