Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTabet, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorPark, June Yen
dc.contributor.authorShilts, Jarroden
dc.contributor.authorSokolowski, Kamilen
dc.contributor.authorRana, Vijayen
dc.contributor.authorKamp, Marlousen
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Ninaen
dc.contributor.authorHoogland, Dominiqueen
dc.contributor.authorScherman, Orenen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-23T23:30:05Z
dc.date.available2019-07-23T23:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2018-01en
dc.identifier.issn2046-1402
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/294826
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the central nervous system and the only purely supramolecular glycosaminoglycan. Much focus has been given to using this high molecular weight polysaccharide for tissue engineering applications. In most studies, HA is covalently functionalized with moieties that can facilitate network formation through physical self-assembly, or covalent crosslinking (e.g. photo-catalyzed) as the polysaccharide does not gel on its own. However, these crosslinks are not the driving force of HA self-assembly in biological tissues. Methods: Oscillatory rheology, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy were used to study albumin/HA structures. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to study albumin/chondroitin sulfate (CS) structures. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the potential for using protein-crosslinked polymers as an ECM-mimetic model to study transport of hydrophilic small molecules. Results: We examine the intermolecular interactions of two major glycosaminoglycans found in the human brain, HA and the lower molecular weight CS, with the model protein albumin. We report the properties of the resulting micro- and nano-materials. Albumin/HA mixtures formed supramolecular gels, and albumin/CS mixtures formed micro- and nanoparticles. These systems are formed from unfunctionalized polysaccharides, which is an attractive and simpler method of forming HA hydrogels and CS nanoparticles than functional chemistry-based approaches such as chemically modifying the polymer backbones. We also summarize the concentrations of HA and CS found in various mammalian brains, which could potentially be useful for biomimetic scaffold development in tissue engineering. Conclusions: Simple preparation and combination of commercially available charged biomacromolecules rapidly result in interesting self-assembled materials with structures at the micron and nanometer length-scales. Such materials may have utility in serving as cost-effective and simple models of nervous system electrostatic interactions and as in vitro drug release and model system for ECM transport studies.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollectionen
dc.languageengen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectGlycosaminoglycansen
dc.subjectChondroitin Sulfatesen
dc.subjectHyaluronic Aciden
dc.subjectHydrogelsen
dc.subjectTissue Engineeringen
dc.titleProtein-mediated gelation and nano-scale assembly of unfunctionalized hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameF1000Researchen
prism.startingPage1827
prism.volume7en
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-04en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.12688/f1000research.16929.3en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01en
dc.contributor.orcidRana, Vijay [0000-0001-7307-6653]
dc.contributor.orcidKamp, Marlous [0000-0003-4915-1312]
dc.contributor.orcidHoogland, Dominique [0000-0002-1655-2833]
dc.contributor.orcidScherman, Oren [0000-0001-8032-7166]
dc.identifier.eissn2046-1402
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International