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dc.contributor.authorTaber, Keithen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-20T23:30:16Z
dc.date.available2019-09-20T23:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-07en
dc.identifier.issn1386-4238
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/297010
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers the nature of a curriculum as presented in formal curriculum documents, and the inherent difficulties of representing formal disciplinary knowledge in a prescription for teaching and learning. The general points are illustrated by examining aspects of a specific example, taken from the chemistry subject content included in the science programmes of study that are part of the National Curriculum in England (an official document published by the UK government). In particular, it is suggested that some statements in the official curriculum document are problematic if we expect a curriculum to represent canonical disciplinary knowledge in an unambiguous and authentic manner.The paper examines the example of the requirement for English school children to be taught that chemical reactions take place in only three different ways (i.e., proton transfer; electron transfer; electron sharing) and considers how this might be interpreted in terms of canonical chemistry and within the wider context of other curriculum statements, in order to make sense of neutralisation and precipitation reactions. It is argued that although target knowledge that is set out as the focus of teaching and learning cannot be identical to disciplinary knowledge, the English National Curriculum offers a representation of chemistry which distorts and confuses canonical ideas. It is suggested that the process of representing the disciplinary knowledge of chemistry as curriculum specifications is worthy of more scholarly attention.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.subjectChemistry educationen
dc.subjectCurricular modelsen
dc.subjectDisciplinary knowledgeen
dc.subjectCanonical conceptsen
dc.subjectChemical reactionsen
dc.titleConceptual confusion in the chemistry curriculum: exemplifying the problematic nature of representing chemical concepts as target knowledgeen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage334
prism.issueIdentifier2en
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameFOUNDATIONS OF CHEMISTRYen
prism.startingPage309
prism.volume22en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.44051
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-17en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10698-019-09346-3en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07en
dc.contributor.orcidTaber, Keith [0000-0002-1798-331X]
dc.identifier.eissn1572-8463
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successMon Jun 22 08:20:28 BST 2020 - Embargo updated*
cam.orpheus.counter13*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-09-26


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