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dc.contributor.authorYerrakalva, Dharanien
dc.contributor.authorYerrakalva, Dhrupadhen
dc.contributor.authorHajna, Samanthaen
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-01T23:30:48Z
dc.date.available2019-10-01T23:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-28en
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/297344
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT Background High sedentary time, low physical activity (PA), and low physical fitness place older adults at increased risk of chronic diseases, functional decline and premature mortality. Mobile health apps, applications that run on mobile platforms, may help promote active living. We aimed to quantify the effect of mobile health app interventions on sedentary time, PA and fitness in older adults (Prospero protocol CRD42018106195). Methods We systematically searched five electronic databases for trials investigating effects of mobile health app interventions on sedentary time, PA and fitness among community-dwelling older adults aged ≥55 years. We calculated pooled standardised mean differences (SMD) in these outcomes between intervention and control groups after the intervention period. We performed a Cochrane risk of bias assessment and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) certainty assessment. Results Six trials (486 participants, 67% women; 68±6years) were included (five of these trials were included in meta-analysis). Mobile health app interventions may be associated with decreases in sedentary time (SMD=−0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.02, 0.03), increases in PA (506 steps/day (95% CI -80, 1092) and increases in fitness (SMD=0.31, 95% CI -0.09, 0.70) in trials ≤3 months and with increases in PA (753 steps/day, 95% CI -147, 1652) in trials ≥6 months. Risk of bias was low for all but one study. The quality of evidence was moderate for PA and sedentary time, and low for fitness. Conclusions Mobile health app interventions have the potential to promote changes in sedentary time and PA over the short-term but results did not achieve statistical significance, possibly because studies were underpowered by small participant numbers. We highlight a need for larger trials with longer follow-up to clarify if apps deliver sustained clinically important effects.
dc.description.sponsorshipDY was funded by a National Institute for Health Research Doctoral Fellowship (DRF-2017-10-121). SH was supported by the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing Cross-Council Programme, the Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12015/4), and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FRN 146766). SJG is a NIHR Senior Investigator. The University of Cambridge has received salary support in respect of SJG from the NHS in the East of England through the Clinical Academic Reserve.
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherJMIR Publications
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleEffects of Mobile Health App Interventions on Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and Fitness in Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier11en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameJournal of medical Internet researchen
prism.startingPagee14343
prism.volume21en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.44393
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-24en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.2196/14343en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-28en
dc.contributor.orcidYerrakalva, Dharani [0000-0003-1830-5315]
dc.contributor.orcidYerrakalva, Dhrupadh [0000-0003-0175-9601]
dc.contributor.orcidHajna, Samantha [0000-0002-0431-2787]
dc.contributor.orcidGriffin, Simon [0000-0002-2157-4797]
dc.identifier.eissn1438-8871
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/4)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-10-01


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