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dc.contributor.authorChewapreecha, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorMather, Alison Een
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Simon Ren
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorHolden, Matthew TGen
dc.contributor.authorChaichana, Chutimaen
dc.contributor.authorWuthiekanun, Vanapornen
dc.contributor.authorDougan, Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorDay, Nicholas PJen
dc.contributor.authorLimmathurotsakul, Direken
dc.contributor.authorParkhill, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, Sharonen
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-21T00:30:49Z
dc.date.available2019-11-21T00:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-01en
dc.identifier.issn2399-3642
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/299096
dc.description.abstractThe environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, an important endemic human disease in tropical and sub-tropical countries. This bacterium occupies broad ecological niches including soil, contaminated water, single-cell microbes, plants and infection in a range of animal species. Here, we performed genome-wide association studies for genetic determinants of environmental and human adaptation using a combined dataset of 1,010 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei from Northeast Thailand and Australia, representing two major disease hotspots. With these data, we identified 47 genes from 26 distinct loci associated with clinical or environmental isolates from Thailand and replicated 12 genes in an independent Australian cohort. We next outlined the selective pressures on the genetic loci (dN/dS) and the frequency at which they had been gained or lost throughout their evolutionary history, reflecting the bacterial adaptability to a wide range of ecological niches. Finally, we highlighted loci likely implicated in human disease.
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollectionen
dc.languageengen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleGenetic variation associated with infection and the environment in the accidental pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameCommunications biologyen
prism.startingPage428
prism.volume2en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.46158
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-04en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s42003-019-0678-xen
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01en
dc.contributor.orcidChewapreecha, Claire [0000-0002-1313-4011]
dc.contributor.orcidHolden, Matthew TG [0000-0002-4958-2166]
dc.contributor.orcidDougan, Gordon [0000-0003-0022-965X]
dc.contributor.orcidParkhill, Julian [0000-0002-7069-5958]
dc.contributor.orcidPeacock, Sharon [0000-0002-1718-2782]
dc.identifier.eissn2399-3642
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (098600/Z/12/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWELLCOME TRUST (107376/Z/15/Z)
cam.orpheus.successTue Mar 31 10:39:06 BST 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY)