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dc.contributor.authorBenjamin-Neelon, Sara Een
dc.contributor.authorHecht, Amelie Aen
dc.contributor.authorBurgoine, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Jeanen
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-30T00:30:24Z
dc.date.available2019-11-30T00:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-03en
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/299461
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Garden-based interventions may increase child intake of fruits and vegetables and offset food costs, but few have been conducted in early care and education (ECE). This study assessed whether nurseries were interested in and perceived any barriers to growing fruits and vegetables. Surveys were mailed to a cross-sectional sample of nurseries in 2012–2013 throughout England. Nurseries were stratified based on socioeconomic status as most, middle, or least deprived areas. We fit logistic regression models to assess the odds of nurseries interested in growing fruits and vegetables and perceiving any barriers, by deprivation tertile. A total of 851 surveys were returned (54% response). Most nurseries (81%) were interested in growing fruits and vegetables. After adjustment, there was no difference in interest in the middle (OR 1.55; CI 0.84, 2.78; p = 0.16) or most (OR 1.05; CI 0.62, 1.78; p = 0.87) deprived areas, compared to the least deprived. Nurseries reported barriers to growing fruits and vegetables, including space (42%), expertise (26%), and time (16%). Those in the most deprived areas were more likely to report space as a barrier (OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.12, 3,66; p = 0.02). Nurseries in the most deprived areas may need creative solutions for growing fruits and vegetables in small spaces.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was undertaken by the Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), a UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) Public Health Research Centre of Excellence. Funding from the British Heart Foundation, Cancer Research UK, Economic and Social Research Council, Medical Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust, under the auspices of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, is gratefully acknowledged. The funders had no role in the design, execution, interpretation, or writing of the study.
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.titlePerceived Barriers to Fruit and Vegetable Gardens in Early Years Settings in England: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey of Nurseries.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier12en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameNutrientsen
prism.volume11en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.46530
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-27en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/nu11122925en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-03en
dc.contributor.orcidBenjamin-Neelon, Sara E [0000-0003-4643-2397]
dc.contributor.orcidBurgoine, Thomas [0000-0001-6936-3801]
dc.contributor.orcidAdams, Jean [0000-0002-5733-7830]
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/K023187/1)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (087636/Z/08/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (ES/G007462/1)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-11-29


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