Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorApergis-Schoute, Annemieke M
dc.contributor.authorBijleveld, Bastiaan
dc.contributor.authorGillan, Claire M
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi A
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbara J
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevor W
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-21T01:34:37Z
dc.date.available2019-12-21T01:34:37Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01
dc.identifier.issn2398-2128
dc.identifier.other31742235
dc.identifier.otherPMC6861127
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/300239
dc.description.abstractNeuroimaging research has highlighted maladaptive thalamo-cortico-striatal interactions in obsessive-compulsive disorder as well as a more general deficit in prefrontal functioning linked with compromised executive functioning. More specifically, dysfunction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, a central hub in coordinating flexible behaviour, is thought to be central to obsessive-compulsive disorder symptomatology. We sought to determine the intrinsic alterations of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder employing resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging analyses with a ventromedial prefrontal cortex seed region of interest. A total of 38 obsessive-compulsive disorder patients and 33 matched controls were included in our analyses. We found widespread ventromedial prefrontal cortex hyperconnectivity during rest in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, displaying increased connectivity with its own surrounding region in addition to hyperconnectivity with several areas along the thalamo-cortico-striatal loop: thalamus, caudate and frontal gyrus. Obsessive-compulsive disorder patients also exhibited increased functional connectivity from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex to temporal and occipital lobes, cerebellum and the motor cortex, reflecting ventromedial prefrontal cortex hyperconnectivity in large-scale brain networks. Furthermore, hyperconnectivity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and caudate correlated with obsessive-compulsive disorder symptomatology. Additionally, we used three key thalamo-cortico-striatal regions that were hyperconnected with our ventromedial prefrontal cortex seed as supplementary seed regions, revealing hypoconnectivity along the orbito- and lateral prefrontal cortex-striatal pathway. Taken together, these results confirm a central role of a hyperconnected ventromedial prefrontal cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder, with a special role for maladaptive crosstalk with the caudate, and indications for hypoconnectivity along the lateral and orbito pathways.
dc.languageeng
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcenlmid: 101702599
dc.sourceessn: 2398-2128
dc.subjectFunctional magnetic resonance imaging
dc.subjectResting state
dc.subjectprefrontal cortex
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive Disorder
dc.subjectNeuroimaging
dc.subjectVentromedial Prefrontal Cortex
dc.titleHyperconnectivity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2019-12-21T01:34:37Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.47312
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/2398212818808710
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0001354)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (104631/z/14/z, 104631)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International