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dc.contributor.authorKunkeler, Nathanen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-17T09:37:30Z
dc.date.available2020-01-17T09:37:30Z
dc.identifier.issn0960-7773
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/300975
dc.description.abstractThe German Nazi party’s reputation grew rapidly with their first electoral breakthrough in the late 1920s. Its combination of bold propaganda, intense activism, hierarchical structure and authoritarian character – not least the absolute authority invested in the Führer – appealed to many aspiring politicians on the far-right.1 Soon, party organisations with similar structures emerged around Europe in what has been termed a second wave of fascism, often copying the entire Nazi hierarchy of Gauleiter, Kreisleiter, and so forth.2 Thus they hoped to also win over the electorate with an authoritarian party machine that would spread across the entire nation, directed by a single charismatic Leader, but typically with less success than their German counterpart. Among these parties was the National Socialist Workers’ Party (NSAP, Nationalsocialistiska Arbetarepartiet) in Sweden and the National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands (NSB, Nationaal-Socialistische Beweging).
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.titleOrganising National Socialism: Nazi organisation in Sweden and the Netherlands, 1931-39en
dc.typeArticleen
prism.publicationNameContemporary European Historyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.48050
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-10en
rioxxterms.versionAM*
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12-10en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.counter92*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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