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dc.contributor.authorAinsworth, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorBrowncross, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Dannyen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Anna Sen
dc.contributor.authorPassingham, Richard Een
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Mark Jen
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBell, Andyen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-23T00:30:47Z
dc.date.available2020-01-23T00:30:47Z
dc.date.issued2018-10en
dc.identifier.issn0028-3932
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/301182
dc.description.abstractDamage following traumatic brain injury or stroke can often extend beyond the boundaries of the initial insult and can lead to maladaptive cortical reorganisation. On the other hand, beneficial cortical reorganisation leading to recovery of function can also occur. Here,we used resting state FMRI (rsFMRI) to examine how functional connectivity in the macaque brain changed across time in response to lesions to the prefrontal cortex, and how this reorganisation correlated with changes in behaviour. Two monkeys were trained to perform location-based and object-based delayed match-to-sample tasks. We also collected rsFMRI data under general anaesthesia at two pre-lesion time-points,separated by 3-4 weeks. After two cycles of testing and scanning, the animals received a principal sulcus lesion followed by an additional 4 cycles of testing and scanning. Later, the same animals received a second lesion to the opposite hemisphere and additional cycles of testing and scanning. Both animals showed a marked behavioural impairment following the first lesion, which was associated with a decrease in functional connectivity, predominantly within frontal-frontal networks in both hemispheres. Approximately 8 weeks following the lesion, performance improved, as did functional connectivity within these networks. Following the second lesion, functional connectivity again decreased and this was associated with a marginal behavioural deficit that did not recover. Our data show that behavioural impairments reflect not just the removal of the lesioned area, but also disturbance to an extensive cortical network. This network can recover by restoring and/or strengthening pre-existing connections, leading to improvement in behaviour.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the MRC intramural program MC-A060-5PQ10 (MA, DM, JD, AB), an MRC Career Development Award G0800329 (AM).
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHanden
dc.subjectPrefrontal Cortexen
dc.subjectNeural Pathwaysen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectMacaca mulattaen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectBrain Mappingen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subjectMotor Activityen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectSpace Perceptionen
dc.subjectVisual Perceptionen
dc.subjectRecovery of Functionen
dc.subjectNeuronal Plasticityen
dc.subjectResten
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPreliminary Dataen
dc.titleFunctional reorganisation and recovery following cortical lesions: A preliminary study in macaque monkeys.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage391
prism.publicationDate2018en
prism.publicationNameNeuropsychologiaen
prism.startingPage382
prism.volume119en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.48260
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-27en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.08.024en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10en
dc.contributor.orcidMitchell, Danny [0000-0001-8729-3886]
dc.contributor.orcidBell, Andy [0000-0001-8420-4622]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3514
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (unknown)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International