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dc.contributor.authorMoseley, RLen
dc.contributor.authorGregory, NJen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Pen
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Carrieen
dc.contributor.authorBaron-Cohen, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-08T00:30:34Z
dc.date.available2020-02-08T00:30:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-10en
dc.identifier.issn2040-2392
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/301846
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Autistic individuals without intellectual disability are at heightened risk of self-injury, and appear to engage in it for similar reasons as non-autistic people. A wide divergence of autistic perspectives on self-injury, including those who frame it as a helpful coping mechanism, motivate investigating the link between self-injury, suicide ideation and attempts which has been reported in typically-developing individuals. Method 103 autistic participants completed the Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Assessment Tool (NSSI-AT), the Suicide Behaviours Questionnaire (SBQ-R) and the Interpersonal Social Evaluation List (ISEL-12) across two online studies. Logistic regression was conducted to predict self-harming status via responses to questions on suicidality, and to predict whether certain self-injurious behaviours, including cutting, were especially associated with suicide ideation and attempts. Non-parametric correlation analysis examined relationships between suicide ideation/attempts and other variables that might characterise self-harmers especially at risk of suicidality. These included perceived access to social support, purposes or reasons for self-injury, the number of different self-injurious behaviours engaged in, the duration and lifetime incidence of self-injury, and the individual’s feelings about their self-injury. Results Whilst self-injuring status was significantly predicted by responses to a question on suicide ideation and attempts, there was no relationship between suicide ideation/attempts and a participant’s personal feelings about their self-injury. The method of cutting was also predicted by suicide ideation and attempts, though other methods common in autistic people were at borderline significance. Use of self-injury for the regulation of low-energy emotional states like depression, for self-punishment or deterrence from suicide, and for sensory stimulation, was associated with suicide ideation and attempts, as was the number of self-injurious behaviours engaged in. There was no significant relationship between suicide ideation/attempts and the duration and lifetime incidence of self-injury or social support. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that whilst individuals might frame their self-injury as a positive or neutral thing, there remains a concerning relationship between self-injury and suicidality which exists regardless of individual feelings on self-injury. This is consistent with the theoretical perspective that self-injury can be a ‘gateway’ through which individuals acquire capability for lethal suicidal behaviours. The data highlight that particular methods (cutting) and reasons for self-injury may be of significant concern, but this information, which might be of extreme value for clinicians, requires further investigation and validation.
dc.description.sponsorshipSBC was funded by the Autism Research Trust, the Wellcome Trust, the Templeton World Charitable Foundation, and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre in Cambridge, during the period of this work. The Medical Research Council (MRC) funded the Cambridge Autism Research Database (CARD) that made this study possible. SBC also received funding from the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking (JU) under grant agreement no. 777394. The JU receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and EFPIA and AUTISM SPEAKS, Autistica, SFARI. His research was also supported by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration East of England (ARC EoE) programme. The views expressed are those of the authors, and not necessarily those of the NIHR, NHS or Department of Health and Social Care.
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rights.uri
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectSelf-Injurious Behavioren
dc.subjectAutistic Disorderen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.titleLinks between self-injury and suicidality in autism.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2020en
prism.publicationNameMolecular autismen
prism.startingPage14
prism.volume11en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.48914
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-30en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s13229-020-0319-8en
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-02-10en
dc.contributor.orcidMoseley, RL [0000-0002-5985-6175]
dc.contributor.orcidAllison, Carrie [0000-0003-2272-2090]
dc.contributor.orcidBaron-Cohen, Simon [0000-0001-9217-2544]
dc.identifier.eissn2040-2392
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0600977)
cam.orpheus.successMon Jun 08 08:20:13 BST 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2023-02-07


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